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Applying CMC Theoreis to Assess Virtual Community
Unformatted Document Text:  CMC Theories and Virtual Community 8 and the degree to which it is successful than are the relatively arbitrary view of the technology that social groups impose upon it (Kraut, Rice, Cool, & Fish, 1998). Later research taking on the importance of social contexts found that not only does the social context influence technology and its impact on individuals, but, in turn, technology may also determine the evolving social context by influencing the creation of norms (Garud & Rappa, 1994) These findings eliminate that technology (media properties, in specific) and social contexts are so interrelated and together influence on new media use and evaluation and they co-evolve (Weisenfeld, Raghuram, and Garud, 1998). Social aspects of CMC Many studies demonstrate that patterns and outcomes of CMC are different from those of face-to-face interaction. For example, being “lean” and asynchronous, CMC produces larger amount of information and longer time to process the information to compensate for missing non-verbal cues such as gesture, body language, facial expressions, and greetings. Even though people develop emoticons (i.e., ;-) to indicate wink) or abbreviation (i.e. ROFL to indicate ‘rolling on the floor laughing’), it still takes longer to exchange these information. For the same reason, CMC is considered not suitable for the ambiguous tasks such as problem solving, resolving conflicts, or reaching consensus (Hiltz, Johnson & Turoff, 1986). Instead, CMC communication is more efficient with established rules and familiar contexts (Zack, 1993). Compare to face-to-face communication, there is no doubt that CMC has different properties and thus produces different outcomes. However, some scholars argue that it does not necessarily mean that CMC is not suitable for building social relationship and further online community. Contrary to early CMC researchers who have focused on the medium’s information processing capacity, these scholars started to

Authors: Chung, Siyoung.
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CMC Theories and Virtual Community
8
and the degree to which it is successful than are the relatively arbitrary view of the
technology that social groups impose upon it (Kraut, Rice, Cool, & Fish, 1998). Later
research taking on the importance of social contexts found that not only does the social
context influence technology and its impact on individuals, but, in turn, technology may
also determine the evolving social context by influencing the creation of norms (Garud
& Rappa, 1994) These findings eliminate that technology (media properties, in specific)
and social contexts are so interrelated and together influence on new media use and
evaluation and they co-evolve (Weisenfeld, Raghuram, and Garud, 1998).
Social aspects of CMC
Many studies demonstrate that patterns and outcomes of CMC are different from
those of face-to-face interaction. For example, being “lean” and asynchronous, CMC
produces larger amount of information and longer time to process the information to
compensate for missing non-verbal cues such as gesture, body language, facial
expressions, and greetings. Even though people develop emoticons (i.e., ;-) to indicate
wink) or abbreviation (i.e. ROFL to indicate ‘rolling on the floor laughing’), it still takes
longer to exchange these information. For the same reason, CMC is considered not
suitable for the ambiguous tasks such as problem solving, resolving conflicts, or
reaching consensus (Hiltz, Johnson & Turoff, 1986). Instead, CMC communication is
more efficient with established rules and familiar contexts (Zack, 1993).
Compare to face-to-face communication, there is no doubt that CMC has
different properties and thus produces different outcomes. However, some scholars
argue that it does not necessarily mean that CMC is not suitable for building social
relationship and further online community. Contrary to early CMC researchers who
have focused on the medium’s information processing capacity, these scholars started to


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