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A Model of Consumer Behaviors in Electronic Commerce: Trust, Information Search, and Internet Shopping
Unformatted Document Text:  11 H5-2. Consumers’ impulsiveness will be negatively related to information seeking on the Internet. A model of Internet Shopping: Trust, Information Search, and Consumer Orientation Parallel to predicting a consumer’s online information searches, online purchasing has been considered as a combined function of trust, Internet skills and dispositional shopping orientations (Donthu & Garcia, 1999; Li, Kuo, & Russel, 1999). Just as the Theory of Planned action shows that attitudes and self-efficacy affect related behaviors, the model presented here posits that trust in electronic commerce and self-confidence in computer skills or time spent on the Internet will influence consumers to actually do online shopping. Given the importance of information seeking already discussed, academicians argue that search activities significantly predict Internet shopping. Empirical studies found that information search on the Internet directly contributed to online purchase, and mediated relationships between the intention to purchase and several antecedent variables (Shim et al., 2001). This evidence confirms that consumers engage in shopping in a hierarchical manner in which the ultimate purchase goal (shopping on the Internet) may be preceded by subgoals (information search on the Internet) (see Lichtestein & Brewer, 1980). Unfortunately, these studies have not make efforts to deal with actual shopping behaviors, focusing on the intention to o purchase. In the model this study presents, we posit that consumers’ trust in electronic commerce and self-perception of Internet-related skills, both directly and indirectly through Information search, lead to the actual shopping instead of intention to shop. Marketing and retailing literatures suggest that consumers’ orientations were also important in predicting Internet purchase (Sheth and Parvatiyar, 1995). Donthu and Garcia

Authors: Keum, Heejo. and Cho, Jaeho.
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11
H5-2. Consumers’ impulsiveness will be negatively related to information seeking on
the Internet.
A model of Internet Shopping: Trust, Information Search, and Consumer Orientation
Parallel to predicting a consumer’s online information searches, online purchasing has
been considered as a combined function of trust, Internet skills and dispositional shopping
orientations (Donthu & Garcia, 1999; Li, Kuo, & Russel, 1999). Just as the Theory of Planned
action shows that attitudes and self-efficacy affect related behaviors, the model presented here
posits that trust in electronic commerce and self-confidence in computer skills or time spent on
the Internet will influence consumers to actually do online shopping.
Given the importance of information seeking already discussed, academicians argue that
search activities significantly predict Internet shopping. Empirical studies found that
information search on the Internet directly contributed to online purchase, and mediated
relationships between the intention to purchase and several antecedent variables (Shim et al.,
2001). This evidence confirms that consumers engage in shopping in a hierarchical manner in
which the ultimate purchase goal (shopping on the Internet) may be preceded by subgoals
(information search on the Internet) (see Lichtestein & Brewer, 1980). Unfortunately, these
studies have not make efforts to deal with actual shopping behaviors, focusing on the intention
to o purchase. In the model this study presents, we posit that consumers’ trust in electronic
commerce and self-perception of Internet-related skills, both directly and indirectly through
Information search, lead to the actual shopping instead of intention to shop.
Marketing and retailing literatures suggest that consumers’ orientations were also
important in predicting Internet purchase (Sheth and Parvatiyar, 1995). Donthu and Garcia


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