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A Model of Consumer Behaviors in Electronic Commerce: Trust, Information Search, and Internet Shopping
Unformatted Document Text:  3 A Model of Consumer Behaviors in Electronic Commerce: Trust, Information Search, and Internet Shopping Shopping on the Internet has grown explosively. The sales at American online retailers surged to $53 billion in 2001, increasing approximately 20 percent over 2000 figures (comscore.com). According to Nielsen/NetRatings and Harris Interactive report (2001), more than 81.2 percent of all adults with Web access have made a purchase online since they started using the Internet. Despite the impressive growth of online shopping, there has not been much research done to formally theorize consumer behaviors in electronic commerce. One group of e-commerce research has explored factors such as demographics, shopping orientation, and other Internet activities, which determine Internet use for shopping (Donthu & Garcia, 1999; Elasmar, Aoki, & Bennett, 2001; Hoffman & Novak, 1997; Li, Kuo, & Russel, 1999; Vellido, Lisboa, & Meehan, 2000). Although these studies describe the characteristics of electronic commerce and provide preliminary information about profiles of online shoppers, they have made little effort to provide a solid theoretical framework. Another set of e-commerce research has examined specific relationships among factors associated with Internet shopping. Specifically, the studies mainly focused on trust in cyberspace and consumers’ information searches on the Internet based on theories in various disciplines such as marketing, retailing, psychology, sociology, technology, and communication. Researchers attempt to conceptualize trust in electronic commerce with various sub-dimensions and to identify theory-guided antecedents and consequences (Lee & Turban, 2001; Ratchford, Talukdar, & Lee, 2001; Tan & Thoen, 2001). Scholars interested in information search develop models of which lead consumers’ active search and hot it is related to Internet shopping behaviors (e.g. Shim, Eastlick, Lotz, & Warrington, 2000). Even though

Authors: Keum, Heejo. and Cho, Jaeho.
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A Model of Consumer Behaviors in Electronic Commerce:
Trust, Information Search, and Internet Shopping
Shopping on the Internet has grown explosively. The sales at American online retailers
surged to $53 billion in 2001, increasing approximately 20 percent over 2000 figures
(comscore.com). According to
Nielsen/NetRatings and Harris Interactive report (2001), more
than 81.2 percent of all adults with Web access have made a purchase online since they started
using the Internet.
Despite the impressive growth of online shopping, there has not been much
research done to formally theorize consumer behaviors in electronic commerce. One group of
e-commerce research has explored factors such as demographics, shopping orientation, and
other Internet activities, which determine Internet use for shopping (Donthu & Garcia, 1999;
Elasmar, Aoki, & Bennett, 2001; Hoffman & Novak, 1997; Li, Kuo, & Russel, 1999; Vellido,
Lisboa, & Meehan, 2000). Although these studies describe the characteristics of electronic
commerce and provide preliminary information about profiles of online shoppers, they have
made little effort to provide a solid theoretical framework.
Another set of e-commerce research has examined specific relationships among factors
associated with Internet shopping. Specifically, the studies mainly focused on trust in
cyberspace and consumers’ information searches on the Internet based on theories in various
disciplines such as marketing, retailing, psychology, sociology, technology, and
communication. Researchers attempt to conceptualize trust in electronic commerce with
various sub-dimensions and to identify theory-guided antecedents and consequences (Lee &
Turban, 2001; Ratchford, Talukdar, & Lee, 2001; Tan & Thoen, 2001). Scholars interested in
information search develop models of which lead consumers’ active search and hot it is related
to Internet shopping behaviors (e.g. Shim, Eastlick, Lotz, & Warrington, 2000). Even though


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