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A Model of Consumer Behaviors in Electronic Commerce: Trust, Information Search, and Internet Shopping
Unformatted Document Text:  5 conceptualizations for trust in electronic commerce (see McKnight & Chervany, 2002). Most of the researchers concur that trust in E-commerce is defined as a willingness to believe (Fung & Lee, 1999) or as beliefs regarding trustworthiness attributes of the other party (Menon, Konana, & Browne, 1999; Stewart, 1999), such as fairness, goodness, strength, ability, benevolence, honesty, and predictability. Despite some variations in conceptualization of trust, there have been agreements that consumers base their trust on trustworthiness attributes of the merchants and the Internet system (Lee & Turban, 2001). The two main components of the level of e-commerce trust are trust in the other party and trust in the control mechanisms (Tan & Thoen, 2001). “Internet shopping involves trust not simply between the Internet merchant and the consumer, but also between the consumer and the computer system through which transactions are executed” (Lee & Turban, 2001, p. 76). In terms of trust in the other party, the Internet merchant, Hoffman, Novak, & Peralta (1999) found that nearly 63 percent of consumers who do not provide personal information to Web sites report because they do not trust who is using the data. Their empirical evidence indicates that consumers’ attitudes toward companies or business are related to trust in electronic commerce. Confidence in business appears to be associated positively with e-commerce trust. On the other hand, the literatures on human-computer interface have discussed Internet users’ trust in computer systems (Muir, 1997). Internet shopping requires consumers to interact with computer systems. “The Internet device such as personal computer that the consumer interacts with is analogous to the sales person in a traditional shop. The extent to which consumers trust this computerized medium is likely to affect their overall trust in Internet shopping” (Lee & Turban, 2001). According to Lee and Moray (1992), human trust in the computer system depends on perception of the Internet technology and the user’s understanding

Authors: Keum, Heejo. and Cho, Jaeho.
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conceptualizations for trust in electronic commerce (see McKnight & Chervany, 2002). Most
of the researchers concur that trust in E-commerce is defined as a willingness to believe (Fung
& Lee, 1999) or as beliefs regarding trustworthiness attributes of the other party (Menon,
Konana, & Browne, 1999; Stewart, 1999), such as fairness, goodness, strength, ability,
benevolence, honesty, and predictability. Despite some variations in conceptualization of trust,
there have been agreements that consumers base their trust on trustworthiness attributes of the
merchants and the Internet system (Lee & Turban, 2001).
The two main components of the level of e-commerce trust are trust in the other party
and trust in the control mechanisms (Tan & Thoen, 2001). “Internet shopping involves trust not
simply between the Internet merchant and the consumer, but also between the consumer and the
computer system through which transactions are executed” (Lee & Turban, 2001, p. 76). In
terms of trust in the other party, the Internet merchant, Hoffman, Novak, & Peralta (1999) found
that nearly 63 percent of consumers who do not provide personal information to Web sites
report because they do not trust who is using the data. Their empirical evidence indicates that
consumers’ attitudes toward companies or business are related to trust in electronic commerce.
Confidence in business appears to be associated positively with e-commerce trust.
On the other hand, the literatures on human-computer interface have discussed Internet
users’ trust in computer systems (Muir, 1997). Internet shopping requires consumers to interact
with computer systems. “The Internet device such as personal computer that the consumer
interacts with is analogous to the sales person in a traditional shop. The extent to which
consumers trust this computerized medium is likely to affect their overall trust in Internet
shopping” (Lee & Turban, 2001). According to Lee and Moray (1992), human trust in the
computer system depends on perception of the Internet technology and the user’s understanding


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