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A Model of Consumer Behaviors in Electronic Commerce: Trust, Information Search, and Internet Shopping
Unformatted Document Text:  8 another variable in the Theory of Planned Behavior, subjective norm, has not shown any significant effect in empirical research (Shim et al, 2001). Shim and colleagues contend that a subjective norm may not be an important issue in electronic commerce since Internet activities are not visible to the public. Many researchers of Internet use have been interested in resource issues such as computer skill and web-access, which is corresponding to the last element of the Theory of Planned Behavior, perceived behavioral control (e.g., Hoffman, Novak, Schlosser, 2000; Nie & Erbring, 2000; Thierer, 2000). Perceived behavioral control has been defined as a person’s perception of “…the presence or absence of requisite resources and opportunities” (Ajzen & Madden, 1986, p.457). Digital divide arguments provide an insight into about the relationships between resource and behavior. Digital divide scholars contend that the failure to obtain appropriate Internet-related skills and web-access is likely to limit communication activities (e.g., Hoffman & Novak, 1999). In the context of electronic commerce, consumers who could not achieve relevant Internet skills are difficult to search information they need. Beyond resources discussed in digital divide arguments, “the concept of perceived behavioral control tends to be a more general construct dealing with whether an individual feels it is within his or her control to perform a specific behavioral act” (Mathieson & Chin, 2001, p.90). Not only objective conditions such as Web access, other underlying reasons such as an individual’s own cognitive and emotional responses toward the Internet technology can also into play. Ajzen (1991, p.184) proposes that “perceived behavioral control is most compatible with Bandura’s (1977, 1982) concept of perceived self-efficacy.” Self-efficacy has been defined as “the belief that one has the capability to perform a particular behavior” (Compeau & Higgins, 1995, p.189).

Authors: Keum, Heejo. and Cho, Jaeho.
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8
another variable in the Theory of Planned Behavior, subjective norm, has not shown any
significant effect in empirical research (Shim et al, 2001). Shim and colleagues contend that a
subjective norm may not be an important issue in electronic commerce since Internet activities
are not visible to the public.
Many researchers of Internet use have been interested in resource issues such as
computer skill and web-access, which is corresponding to the last element of the Theory of
Planned Behavior, perceived behavioral control (e.g., Hoffman, Novak, Schlosser, 2000; Nie &
Erbring, 2000; Thierer, 2000). Perceived behavioral control has been defined as a person’s
perception of “…the presence or absence of requisite resources and opportunities” (Ajzen &
Madden, 1986, p.457). Digital divide arguments provide an insight into about the relationships
between resource and behavior. Digital divide scholars contend that the failure to obtain
appropriate Internet-related skills and web-access is likely to limit communication activities
(e.g., Hoffman & Novak, 1999). In the context of electronic commerce, consumers who could
not achieve relevant Internet skills are difficult to search information they need.
Beyond resources discussed in digital divide arguments, “the concept of perceived
behavioral control tends to be a more general construct dealing with whether an individual feels
it is within his or her control to perform a specific behavioral act” (Mathieson & Chin, 2001,
p.90). Not only objective conditions such as Web access, other underlying reasons such as an
individual’s own cognitive and emotional responses toward the Internet technology can also
into play. Ajzen (1991, p.184) proposes that “perceived behavioral control is most compatible
with Bandura’s (1977, 1982) concept of perceived self-efficacy.” Self-efficacy has been
defined as “the belief that one has the capability to perform a particular behavior” (Compeau &
Higgins, 1995, p.189).


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