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A Model of Consumer Behaviors in Electronic Commerce: Trust, Information Search, and Internet Shopping
Unformatted Document Text:  9 Online Consumers’ self-confidence in Internet technology appears to be significant because most of consumers cost-effectively convey the information they need (see Ratchford, Talukar, & Lee, 2001). Consumers feel different demand for each information source depending on skills at using the source. “Increases in skill and access lower the marginal cost of obtaining a given level of benefit of search, making search more attractive” (Ratchford et al., 2001, p.10). It is obviously time-consuming task for consumers unfamiliar with computer systems to obtain Internet skills. Accordingly, Internet skills and access time tend to be positively related to consumers’ Internet use for information search. Beyond Internet-related attitudes and resources, consumers’ dispositional orientations need to be considered since online information search is not only a type of Internet activities but also a meaningful stage of consumption process (see Klein, 1998). Consumer orientations are conceptualized as general predisposition toward acts of consumption (Kuo, & Russell, 1999). Furse, Punj, and Stewart (1982) demonstrate that consumption orientations have influences on how much consumers gather information and which source they use. Particularly, developed models in communication discipline suggest that individuals’ dispositional orientations shape patterns of information seeking behaviors (Levy & Windahl, 1985; Kosicki & McLeod, 1990). This study posits that there are two particular consumer orientations – innovativeness and impulsiveness-predicting information search on the Internet. Innovative people who are willing to try new products are those who are most likely to make the effort obtain information about products and services. Internet is a very useful source of information for keeping informed about product and service innovations. Many scholars argue that consumers have self-expression motivation in consumption behaviors (Katz, Gurevitch, and Haas, 1973;

Authors: Keum, Heejo. and Cho, Jaeho.
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9
Online Consumers’ self-confidence in Internet technology appears to be significant
because most of consumers cost-effectively convey the information they need (see Ratchford,
Talukar, & Lee, 2001). Consumers feel different demand for each information source
depending on skills at using the source. “Increases in skill and access lower the marginal cost
of obtaining a given level of benefit of search, making search more attractive” (Ratchford et al.,
2001, p.10). It is obviously time-consuming task for consumers unfamiliar with computer
systems to obtain Internet skills. Accordingly, Internet skills and access time tend to be
positively related to consumers’ Internet use for information search.
Beyond Internet-related attitudes and resources, consumers’ dispositional orientations
need to be considered since online information search is not only a type of Internet activities but
also a meaningful stage of consumption process (see Klein, 1998). Consumer orientations are
conceptualized as general predisposition toward acts of consumption (Kuo, & Russell, 1999).
Furse, Punj, and Stewart (1982) demonstrate that consumption orientations have influences on
how much consumers gather information and which source they use. Particularly, developed
models in communication discipline suggest that individuals’ dispositional orientations shape
patterns of information seeking behaviors (Levy & Windahl, 1985; Kosicki & McLeod, 1990).
This study posits that there are two particular consumer orientations – innovativeness
and impulsiveness-predicting information search on the Internet. Innovative people who are
willing to try new products are those who are most likely to make the effort obtain information
about products and services. Internet is a very useful source of information for keeping
informed about product and service innovations. Many scholars argue that consumers have
self-expression motivation in consumption behaviors (Katz, Gurevitch, and Haas, 1973;


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