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A Moderating Role of Channel Responsiveness in the Effects of Online Information Source
Unformatted Document Text:  14 the Web site. Information seeking intention and preventive behavior intention represented behavior intention measures. Control Variables Involvement with health information on the Web. This variable consisted of twenty items from Zichkowsky’s (1985) scale and has demonstrated a high internal consistency in past studies (e.g. = .97). Of the 20 items located on a seven-point semantic differential scale, 10 items were reverse coded (see Appendix 1). An index that averaged responses to the 20 items yielded internal consistency of = .97. This variable (M = 4.73, SD = 1.21) was negatively skewed (skewness = -.74), and thus underwent a squared transformation to approach normality. Time spent on the Internet. A single question was asked to measure average time spent per day on the Internet (“How much time on average do you spend per day on the Internet?). Participants responded in hours and/or minutes, which were transformed to minutes. Time spent on the Internet looking for health information and Time spent on the Internet looking for allergy information. Participants were asked to indicate a percentage of total time spent on the Internet looking for health information and allergy information. The percentage was used to calculate actual minutes spent. Responses to these variables were found to be close to zero (M = 0, SD = 0 for both), and thus dropped for subsequent analyses. Severity of individual allergies. Two questions measured this variable. Participants were first asked if they themselves have allergies (“Yes” coded as one; “No” coded as zero) and then how severe their allergies are (seven-point Likert-type scale, anchored with “Not severe at all” and “Very severe”). The two questions were multiplied to indicate severity of individual allergies. Family history of allergies. In addition to history and severity of self-allergies, nine questions, adapted from Rimal and Kim’s (2002) scale, were used to measure allergy history of family members or friends (see Appendix 1). Participants were given four choices, “Yes,” “No,” “Don’t know,” and “Not applicable.” “Yes” was coded as one and other responses were coded as zero. A preliminary analysis showed that participants were only aware of the immediate

Authors: Kim, Hyojin. and Stephens, Keri.
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the Web site. Information seeking intention and preventive behavior intention represented
behavior intention measures.
Control Variables
Involvement with health information on the Web. This variable consisted of twenty
items from Zichkowsky’s (1985) scale and has demonstrated a high internal consistency in past
studies (e.g. = .97). Of the 20 items located on a seven-point semantic differential scale, 10
items were reverse coded (see Appendix 1). An index that averaged responses to the 20 items
yielded internal consistency of = .97. This variable (M = 4.73, SD = 1.21) was negatively
skewed (skewness = -.74), and thus underwent a squared transformation to approach normality.
Time spent on the Internet. A single question was asked to measure average time spent
per day on the Internet (“How much time on average do you spend per day on the Internet?).
Participants responded in hours and/or minutes, which were transformed to minutes.
Time spent on the Internet looking for health information and Time spent on the Internet
looking for allergy information. Participants were asked to indicate a percentage of total time
spent on the Internet looking for health information and allergy information. The percentage was
used to calculate actual minutes spent. Responses to these variables were found to be close to
zero (M = 0, SD = 0 for both), and thus dropped for subsequent analyses.
Severity of individual allergies. Two questions measured this variable. Participants were
first asked if they themselves have allergies (“Yes” coded as one; “No” coded as zero) and then
how severe their allergies are (seven-point Likert-type scale, anchored with “Not severe at all”
and “Very severe”). The two questions were multiplied to indicate severity of individual
allergies.
Family history of allergies. In addition to history and severity of self-allergies, nine
questions, adapted from Rimal and Kim’s (2002) scale, were used to measure allergy history of
family members or friends (see Appendix 1). Participants were given four choices, “Yes,” “No,”
“Don’t know,” and “Not applicable.” “Yes” was coded as one and other responses were coded
as zero. A preliminary analysis showed that participants were only aware of the immediate


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