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A Moderating Role of Channel Responsiveness in the Effects of Online Information Source
Unformatted Document Text:  17 preventive behavior intention (see Appendix 1). While prior preventive behaviors were measured on a nominal scale (see under Control Variables), preventive behavior intention was measured on a seven-point Likert type scale, ranging from “Very likely” to “Very unlikely.” Responses to the nine items were reverse coded and averaged into an index ( = .77). Four questions were asked to measure the likelihood that participants would seek additional information on a seven-point Likert-type scale ranging from “Very likely” to “Very unlikely” (see Appendix 1). The last item, “If a family member suspects that he or she has allergies and asks me what I know about allergies, I will recommend that they read the information I just read in this Web site,” was dropped to improve internal consistency and the remaining items, after being reverse coded, were averaged into an index ( = .85). Manipulation Check Source manipulation was checked by measuring participants’ perception of source credibility. Perceived credibility of the source was measured with 18 items located on a seven- point semantic differential scale, which were borrowed from McCroskey and Teven’s (1999) scale. Of the 18 items, 11 item were reverse coded (see Appendix 1). The 18 items were submitted to a principal component factor analysis with varimax rotation in order to determine if the 18 items could be classified into their intended underlying dimensions. Three factors with eigen values greater than one emerged, corresponding to the original factor structure of McCroskey and Teven’s (1999) scale. Therefore, all items were retained. Constituent variables were averaged into an index, each of trustworthiness ( = .89), competence ( = .92) and goodwill ( = .86) (see Appendix 1). Checks for a normal distribution of the three indices indicated that trustworthiness (M = 5.01, SD = .87) was positively skewed (skewness = .87); competence (M = 5.62, SD = .96) negatively skewed (skewness = -.47); and goodwill (M = 4.66, SD = .88) positively skewed (skewness = .30). Therefore, trustworthiness underwent a fifth root transformation; competence a squared transformation; and goodwill a square root transformation. The responsiveness manipulation was checked by asking four questions on a seven-point Likert-type scale, ranging from “Strongly disagree” to “Strongly agree” (see Appendix 1).

Authors: Kim, Hyojin. and Stephens, Keri.
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17
preventive behavior intention (see Appendix 1). While prior preventive behaviors were
measured on a nominal scale (see under Control Variables), preventive behavior intention was
measured on a seven-point Likert type scale, ranging from “Very likely” to “Very unlikely.”
Responses to the nine items were reverse coded and averaged into an index ( = .77).
Four questions were asked to measure the likelihood that participants would seek
additional information on a seven-point Likert-type scale ranging from “Very likely” to “Very
unlikely” (see Appendix 1). The last item, “If a family member suspects that he or she has
allergies and asks me what I know about allergies, I will recommend that they read the
information I just read in this Web site,” was dropped to improve internal consistency and the
remaining items, after being reverse coded, were averaged into an index ( = .85).
Manipulation Check
Source manipulation was checked by measuring participants’ perception of source
credibility. Perceived credibility of the source was measured with 18 items located on a seven-
point semantic differential scale, which were borrowed from McCroskey and Teven’s (1999)
scale. Of the 18 items, 11 item were reverse coded (see Appendix 1). The 18 items were
submitted to a principal component factor analysis with varimax rotation in order to determine if
the 18 items could be classified into their intended underlying dimensions. Three factors with
eigen values greater than one emerged, corresponding to the original factor structure of
McCroskey and Teven’s (1999) scale. Therefore, all items were retained. Constituent variables
were averaged into an index, each of trustworthiness ( = .89), competence ( = .92) and
goodwill ( = .86) (see Appendix 1). Checks for a normal distribution of the three indices
indicated that trustworthiness (M = 5.01, SD = .87) was positively skewed (skewness = .87);
competence (M = 5.62, SD = .96) negatively skewed (skewness = -.47); and goodwill (M = 4.66,
SD = .88) positively skewed (skewness = .30). Therefore, trustworthiness underwent a fifth root
transformation; competence a squared transformation; and goodwill a square root transformation.
The responsiveness manipulation was checked by asking four questions on a seven-point
Likert-type scale, ranging from “Strongly disagree” to “Strongly agree” (see Appendix 1).


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