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Video Game Uses and Gratifications as Predictors of Use and Game Preference
Unformatted Document Text:  Video game U&G 9 designed to funnel responses from general to specific and allowing for probes (Morgan, 1997). Interviews were analyzed for repeated themes representing dimensions of video game play motivations. Analysis of focus group data resulted in six dominant dimensions of video game use. These included Competition, Challenge, Social Interaction, Diversion, Arousal, and Fantasy. Competition. One of the most frequently cited reasons for playing video games was to prove to other people who has the best skills and can react or think the fastest. Typical of the responses of individuals who enjoy the competitive aspects of video game play were: ƒ “We always play in all house (fraternity) tournaments. We used to put money down.” ƒ “I love trying to beat the guys next door or brothers.” ƒ “[Competition] is pretty much the only reason why I play. We, like, have an intercom in our house and they’ll call you out and you’ll have to defend.” ƒ “It gets personal. It’s funny.” ƒ “When you play with someone you’ve never played with, and they think they’re the expert, and you beat them finally, you get invited to play with them more. Because it’s like, ‘I’m going to beat you this time.’” Challenge. Many respondents also enjoy playing video games to push themselves to a higher level of skill or personal accomplishment. For some, the desire to solve the puzzles to achieve goals such as getting to the next level or beating the game can be addicting. Many of the players prefer to stick to their regular list of games that they feel confident playing. ƒ “I like it because it’s a challenge and I like competition. I keep playing until I complete a level or win the game.” ƒ “It seems to be addicting to play, you always want to do better and better.” ƒ “The only reason why I play now is to get a better score.”

Authors: Sherry, John. and Lucas, Kristen.
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Video game U&G 9
designed to funnel responses from general to specific and allowing for probes (Morgan, 1997).
Interviews were analyzed for repeated themes representing dimensions of video game play
motivations. Analysis of focus group data resulted in six dominant dimensions of video game
use. These included Competition, Challenge, Social Interaction, Diversion, Arousal, and Fantasy.
Competition. One of the most frequently cited reasons for playing video games was to
prove to other people who has the best skills and can react or think the fastest. Typical of the
responses of individuals who enjoy the competitive aspects of video game play were:
ƒ “We always play in all house (fraternity) tournaments. We used to put money down.”
ƒ
“I love trying to beat the guys next door or brothers.”
ƒ “[Competition] is pretty much the only reason why I play. We, like, have an intercom in
our house and they’ll call you out and you’ll have to defend.”
ƒ “It gets personal. It’s funny.”
ƒ “When you play with someone you’ve never played with, and they think they’re the
expert, and you beat them finally, you get invited to play with them more. Because it’s
like, ‘I’m going to beat you this time.’”
Challenge. Many respondents also enjoy playing video games to push themselves to a
higher level of skill or personal accomplishment. For some, the desire to solve the puzzles to
achieve goals such as getting to the next level or beating the game can be addicting. Many of the
players prefer to stick to their regular list of games that they feel confident playing.
ƒ
“I like it because it’s a challenge and I like competition. I keep playing until I complete a
level or win the game.”
ƒ “It seems to be addicting to play, you always want to do better and better.”
ƒ “The only reason why I play now is to get a better score.”


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