All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Re-conceptualizing interruptions in physician-patient interview: Co-operative and intrusive
Unformatted Document Text:  Interruption Patterns 4 The other view holds that some type of interruption can serve as a way of getting involved, showing support and solidarity (e.g., Hayashi, 1988; Mizutani, 1988; Moerman, 1988; Roger, & Nesshoever, 1987; Tannen, 1981, 1994) or building rapport (Goldberg, 1990). Ng, Brook and Dunne (1995) reported that sometimes an interruption was a means to rescue or promote the current speaker, or to elaborate on the content of the current speech. Following the two views on interruption, two broad types of interruptions have been distinguished: co-operative and intrusive (Murata, 1994; Li, 2001; Tannen, 1994), although they are termed variably. For example, Goldberg (1990) differentiated interruptions as power and non-power, Kennedy and Camden (1983) distinguished them disconfirming and confirming, while Bennett (1981) preferred the terms conflicting and less conflicting. Ng, Brook, & Dunne (1995) detected disruptive and supportive types of interruptions. Co-operative Interruption. Murata (1994) argues that co-operative interruptions intend to help the current speaker by co-ordinating on the process and/or content of the on-going conversation. Tannen (1994) proposes that this type of interruption supports the on-going conversation by way of expressing the interrupter’s high involvement and solidarity. Co-operative interruption contains three subcategories: agreement, assistance and clarification (Kennedy & Camden. 1983, Li, 2001). According to Kennedy and Camden (1983), an agreement interruption enables the interrupter to show concurrence, compliance, understanding, or support. The purpose of an agreement interruption often takes the form of overlapping, showing interest or enthusiasm and involvement in the ongoing conversation.

Authors: Li, Han., Krysko, Michael., Desroches, Naghmeh. and Deagle, George.
first   previous   Page 4 of 37   next   last



background image
Interruption Patterns
4
The other view holds that some type of interruption can serve as a way of getting
involved, showing support and solidarity (e.g., Hayashi, 1988; Mizutani, 1988; Moerman,
1988; Roger, & Nesshoever, 1987; Tannen, 1981, 1994) or building rapport (Goldberg,
1990). Ng, Brook and Dunne (1995) reported that sometimes an interruption was a means
to rescue or promote the current speaker, or to elaborate on the content of the current
speech.
Following the two views on interruption, two broad types of interruptions have
been distinguished: co-operative and intrusive (Murata, 1994; Li, 2001; Tannen, 1994),
although they are termed variably. For example, Goldberg (1990) differentiated
interruptions as power and non-power, Kennedy and Camden (1983) distinguished them
disconfirming and confirming, while Bennett (1981) preferred the terms conflicting and
less conflicting. Ng, Brook, & Dunne (1995) detected disruptive and supportive types of
interruptions.
Co-operative Interruption. Murata (1994) argues that co-operative interruptions
intend to help the current speaker by co-ordinating on the process and/or content of the
on-going conversation. Tannen (1994) proposes that this type of interruption supports the
on-going conversation by way of expressing the interrupter’s high involvement and
solidarity. Co-operative interruption contains three subcategories: agreement, assistance
and clarification (Kennedy & Camden. 1983, Li, 2001).
According to Kennedy and Camden (1983), an agreement interruption enables the
interrupter to show concurrence, compliance, understanding, or support. The purpose of
an agreement interruption often takes the form of overlapping, showing interest or
enthusiasm and involvement in the ongoing conversation.


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 37   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.