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Re-conceptualizing interruptions in physician-patient interview: Co-operative and intrusive
Unformatted Document Text:  Interruption Patterns 5 In the case of assistance interruption, the interrupter perceives that the speaker needs help. In order to rescue (Hayashi, 1988; Mizutani, 1988; Moerman, 1988; Ng et al., 1995; Roger, & Nesshoever, 1987) the current speaker, the interrupter provides a word, a phrase, or a sentence. Clarification interruption enables the interlocutors to have a common understanding of what has been said, thus establishing a common ground (Clark & Brennan, 1991, Li, 1999b) for further communication. When the listener is unclear about a piece of information the current speaker has just elicited, the listener interrupts the speaker to request clarification (Kennedy & Camden, 1983). Intrusive interruption. Intrusive interruption usually poses a threat to the current speaker’s territory by disrupting the process and/or content of the on-going conversation (Goldberg, 1990; Murata, 1994; Rogers & Jones, 1975). Intrusive interruption has four subcategories: disagreement, floor-taking, topic-change (Murata, 1994) and tangentialization (Kennedy & Camden, 1983). Disagreement interruption occurs when the interlocutor in the role of the listener disagrees with what the current speaker is saying. The listener interrupts to voice his/her opposing opinion. In the case of floor-taking interruption, the interrupter does not intend to change the topic of the current speaker. Instead, the interrupter usually develops the topic of the current speaker, and does so by taking over the floor from the current speaker. However, the interrupter is free to change the topic once he or she successfully takes over the floor. Floor-taking interruption differs from topic-change interruption in that the initial purpose of the latter is to change the topic. A tangentialization interruption occurs when the listener thinks that the information

Authors: Li, Han., Krysko, Michael., Desroches, Naghmeh. and Deagle, George.
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Interruption Patterns
5
In the case of assistance interruption, the interrupter perceives that the speaker
needs help. In order to rescue (Hayashi, 1988; Mizutani, 1988; Moerman, 1988; Ng et al.,
1995; Roger, & Nesshoever, 1987) the current speaker, the interrupter provides a word, a
phrase, or a sentence.
Clarification interruption enables the interlocutors to have a common
understanding of what has been said, thus establishing a common ground (Clark &
Brennan, 1991, Li, 1999b) for further communication. When the listener is unclear about
a piece of information the current speaker has just elicited, the listener interrupts the
speaker to request clarification (Kennedy & Camden, 1983).
Intrusive interruption. Intrusive interruption usually poses a threat to the current
speaker’s territory by disrupting the process and/or content of the on-going conversation
(Goldberg, 1990; Murata, 1994; Rogers & Jones, 1975). Intrusive interruption has four
subcategories: disagreement, floor-taking, topic-change (Murata, 1994) and
tangentialization (Kennedy & Camden, 1983).
Disagreement interruption occurs when the interlocutor in the role of the listener
disagrees with what the current speaker is saying. The listener interrupts to voice his/her
opposing opinion. In the case of floor-taking interruption, the interrupter does not intend
to change the topic of the current speaker. Instead, the interrupter usually develops the
topic of the current speaker, and does so by taking over the floor from the current
speaker. However, the interrupter is free to change the topic once he or she successfully
takes over the floor. Floor-taking interruption differs from topic-change interruption in
that the initial purpose of the latter is to change the topic.
A tangentialization interruption occurs when the listener thinks that the information


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