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Framing media mergers in France and the United States
Unformatted Document Text:  Framing media mergers in France and the United States 11 the debate” (Terkildsen et al., 1998, 53). The same study concluded that the media generated new symbols and group labels to enhance the debate, and excluded some groups including feminist movements in order not to introduce more dimensions into the debate. Cook et al. (1983) described a different press-politics dynamic. While analyzing the agenda setting effect of a television investigative report on fraud in a federally funded Home healthcare program, they were witnesses to extensive cooperation between the investigative team and members of a Senate committee immediately before and after the report was aired. This was done in an attempt to increase the exposure of both the report and the committee hearings. This study provided further support to the contention that the press – in some cases - is no longer (if it ever was) an adversary of political actors. In essence, this finding also refuted the phlegmatic nature Mannheim attributed to journalists 9 . Another study dealt with telecommunication issues. Hollifield (1998) carried out a comparative analysis of the coverage of the NII (National Information Infrastructure) initiative proposed by the Clinton administration to jumpstart investment in data communications in the U.S. The study included analysis of industry and non-industry related journals as well as general newspapers. The study, unsurprisingly, revealed that trade publications seldom dealt with the social and political implications of the initiative. However, interestingly for our purposes, though the mass media did provide heavier coverage of the socio-political angle than the trade publications did, it was still secondary in importance to the economic angle in the first phase of the proposal’s development, and 9 Another study carried out by a closely related group of researchers (Protess et al., 1987) found similar collaboration between officials and journalists.

Authors: Davidson, Roei.
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Framing media mergers in France and the United States
11
the debate” (Terkildsen et al., 1998, 53). The same study concluded that the media
generated new symbols and group labels to enhance the debate, and excluded some
groups including feminist movements in order not to introduce more dimensions into the
debate.
Cook et al. (1983) described a different press-politics dynamic. While analyzing the
agenda setting effect of a television investigative report on fraud in a federally funded
Home healthcare program, they were witnesses to extensive cooperation between the
investigative team and members of a Senate committee immediately before and after the
report was aired. This was done in an attempt to increase the exposure of both the report
and the committee hearings. This study provided further support to the contention that the
press – in some cases - is no longer (if it ever was) an adversary of political actors. In
essence, this finding also refuted the phlegmatic nature Mannheim attributed to
journalists
9
.
Another study dealt with telecommunication issues. Hollifield (1998) carried out a
comparative analysis of the coverage of the NII (National Information Infrastructure)
initiative proposed by the Clinton administration to jumpstart investment in data
communications in the U.S. The study included analysis of industry and non-industry
related journals as well as general newspapers. The study, unsurprisingly, revealed that
trade publications seldom dealt with the social and political implications of the initiative.
However, interestingly for our purposes, though the mass media did provide heavier
coverage of the socio-political angle than the trade publications did, it was still secondary
in importance to the economic angle in the first phase of the proposal’s development, and
9
Another study carried out by a closely related group of researchers (Protess et al., 1987) found similar
collaboration between officials and journalists.


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