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Framing media mergers in France and the United States
Unformatted Document Text:  Framing media mergers in France and the United States 19 political implications at the individual level. The relevant constituency according to these frames is quite narrow, including business executives and investors. Additionally, a list of possible sources was compiled. This list included: commercial sources (including merging companies, competing companies and analysts 13 ), regulators, interest groups, academics, journalists, and members of the public. The type of sources used should enable us to answer one of the questions raised in the media-policy literature concerning the voices heard in policy debates and problems (Bennett, 1993). Coders counted each attribution or direct cite of a source as a separate instance. At the data analysis stage, these figures were reviewed, with the category having the highest number of cites or attributions coded as the primary source. Finally, the section in which the article was located was also identified. This variable was measured based on the assumption that newspaper and newsmagazine sections are differentially read, and certain readers systematically avoid certain sections. While we found no prior academic literature regarding this issue, market research data collected by the newspaper industry (Scarborough research, 2001) suggests that only 60% of adult readers read the business section, 66% among males and only 53% among females. Thus, stories that are published in the business section will fail a priori to reach those individuals who do not read the business section. Coders The coders of French articles were two native speakers of French. Both have graduate level education and developed awareness of political communication issues. One of these 13 These three categories were collapsed to create the commercial source category in order to improve higher inter-coder reliability.

Authors: Davidson, Roei.
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Framing media mergers in France and the United States
19
political implications at the individual level. The relevant constituency according to these
frames is quite narrow, including business executives and investors.
Additionally, a list of possible sources was compiled. This list included: commercial
sources (including merging companies, competing companies and analysts
13
), regulators,
interest groups, academics, journalists, and members of the public. The type of sources
used should enable us to answer one of the questions raised in the media-policy literature
concerning the voices heard in policy debates and problems (Bennett, 1993). Coders
counted each attribution or direct cite of a source as a separate instance. At the data
analysis stage, these figures were reviewed, with the category having the highest number
of cites or attributions coded as the primary source.
Finally, the section in which the article was located was also identified. This variable was
measured based on the assumption that newspaper and newsmagazine sections are
differentially read, and certain readers systematically avoid certain sections. While we
found no prior academic literature regarding this issue, market research data collected by
the newspaper industry (Scarborough research, 2001) suggests that only 60% of adult
readers read the business section, 66% among males and only 53% among females. Thus,
stories that are published in the business section will fail a priori to reach those
individuals who do not read the business section.
Coders
The coders of French articles were two native speakers of French. Both have graduate
level education and developed awareness of political communication issues. One of these
13
These three categories were collapsed to create the commercial source category in order to improve
higher inter-coder reliability.


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