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Effects of visual cues on public self-awareness and perceived anonymity of self
Unformatted Document Text:  Visual Cues and Perceived Self-Anonymity 10 I have thus suggested that self-awareness mediates the effects of visual cues on anonymity. Further, as with prior research, I suggested that visual cues lead to public self-awareness. What is now needed is to empirically assess the existence of these two effects of visual cues on anonymity, one direct effect and one indirect effect through self-awareness. Next, I will describe a pilot study designed to test for the direct effect of visual cues on perceived anonymity (Hypothesis 1) as well the possibility that public self-awareness mediates the relationship between visual cues and perceived anonymity (Hypothesis 2). Methods. Participants 44 (23 female and 21 male) students from an organizational behavior class at a public southwestern university participated in this study. Participants were separated into groups of six people. The participants were given extra credit for participating in the studies and asked to sign up in a time slot for the experiment. Because some time slots were not filled, and because some participants that signed in did not show up, some groups had less members than others. In an extreme case, only two students showed up and their results in the experiment had to be dropped. Because of this, the analysis considers only 42 (21 female 21 male) students in 8 groups. The mean size of groups was 5.63 and a median of 6. Design The main purpose of this stage was to test the effects of visual cues on self-awareness and perceived anonymity. Thus, the cognitive effort of the task and its effect are only briefly explored. The experimental design for this stage is a 2x1 design where the two conditions are co- presence and physical separation. The design is set up in a way that subjects in both conditions are not provided with any identifying information in terms of names of other group members.

Authors: Gomez, Luis.
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Visual Cues and Perceived Self-Anonymity
10
I have thus suggested that self-awareness mediates the effects of visual cues on anonymity.
Further, as with prior research, I suggested that visual cues lead to public self-awareness. What
is now needed is to empirically assess the existence of these two effects of visual cues on
anonymity, one direct effect and one indirect effect through self-awareness. Next, I will describe
a pilot study designed to test for the direct effect of visual cues on perceived anonymity
(Hypothesis 1) as well the possibility that public self-awareness mediates the relationship
between visual cues and perceived anonymity (Hypothesis 2).
Methods.
Participants
44 (23 female and 21 male) students from an organizational behavior class at a public
southwestern university participated in this study. Participants were separated into groups of six
people. The participants were given extra credit for participating in the studies and asked to sign
up in a time slot for the experiment. Because some time slots were not filled, and because some
participants that signed in did not show up, some groups had less members than others. In an
extreme case, only two students showed up and their results in the experiment had to be dropped.
Because of this, the analysis considers only 42 (21 female 21 male) students in 8 groups. The
mean size of groups was 5.63 and a median of 6.
Design
The main purpose of this stage was to test the effects of visual cues on self-awareness and
perceived anonymity. Thus, the cognitive effort of the task and its effect are only briefly
explored. The experimental design for this stage is a 2x1 design where the two conditions are co-
presence and physical separation. The design is set up in a way that subjects in both conditions
are not provided with any identifying information in terms of names of other group members.


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