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Effects of visual cues on public self-awareness and perceived anonymity of self
Unformatted Document Text:  Visual Cues and Perceived Self-Anonymity 12 within the forty minutes, two groups could not get to the conclusions and were prompted to work on the survey instead. Measures Perceived anonymity. Most research regarding anonymity usually treats it as a manipulation, and focus on its effects. In this sense, the survey included items to measure anonymity both from the perception of others in the group as well as the perception that the group can identify the respondent. Although these measures might be highly correlated (if I can identify others it is likely that I perceive I can be identified by them as well), both sides of perceived anonymity, self and others, were included in the survey. There were six items for the perception of perceived anonymity of self. These items had a reliability of =.65. Because most prior research has considered anonymity as a manipulation, there was no unambiguous benchmark against which to compare these items. In this sense, this scale is an attempt to get at perceived anonymity For the perceived anonymity of others there were five items, with a reliability level of =.62. Dropping item five increased reliability to =.68. Thus, only four items were used in the analysis. Self-awareness. The items included to measure self-awareness are those used in previous GDSS research. Five items of public self-awareness were adapted from the original self- consciousness scale created by (Fenigstein, Scheier, & Buss, 1975) Fenigstein, Scheier, and Bus (1975). It is important to note that while Fenigstein et al (1975) focused on self-consciousness as a disposition, an enduring trait of the individual, there are no other differences other than permanency between the constructs of self-consciousness and self-awareness. The cronbach alpha for these five items was =.72. This alpha level is a little low compared to Pisonneault and Heppel’s (1998) modified scale, however, they are more closely related to the theoretical

Authors: Gomez, Luis.
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background image
Visual Cues and Perceived Self-Anonymity
12
within the forty minutes, two groups could not get to the conclusions and were prompted to work
on the survey instead.
Measures
Perceived anonymity. Most research regarding anonymity usually treats it as a
manipulation, and focus on its effects. In this sense, the survey included items to measure
anonymity both from the perception of others in the group as well as the perception that the
group can identify the respondent. Although these measures might be highly correlated (if I can
identify others it is likely that I perceive I can be identified by them as well), both sides of
perceived anonymity, self and others, were included in the survey.
There were six items for the perception of perceived anonymity of self. These items had a
reliability of =.65. Because most prior research has considered anonymity as a manipulation,
there was no unambiguous benchmark against which to compare these items. In this sense, this
scale is an attempt to get at perceived anonymity For the perceived anonymity of others there
were five items, with a reliability level of =.62. Dropping item five increased reliability to
=.68. Thus, only four items were used in the analysis.
Self-awareness. The items included to measure self-awareness are those used in previous
GDSS research. Five items of public self-awareness were adapted from the original self-
consciousness scale created by (Fenigstein, Scheier, & Buss, 1975) Fenigstein, Scheier, and Bus
(1975). It is important to note that while Fenigstein et al (1975) focused on self-consciousness as
a disposition, an enduring trait of the individual, there are no other differences other than
permanency between the constructs of self-consciousness and self-awareness. The cronbach
alpha for these five items was =.72. This alpha level is a little low compared to Pisonneault
and Heppel’s (1998) modified scale, however, they are more closely related to the theoretical


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