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Effects of visual cues on public self-awareness and perceived anonymity of self
Unformatted Document Text:  Visual Cues and Perceived Self-Anonymity 14 The test for mediation in this study was based on regressions to check for the three conditions. First, a regression was done with visual cues as independent variable and visual cues, as the DV. On this first regression, group size and cognitive effort were included as control variables. A second regression was then run with perceived self-anonymity as the DV and public self-awareness as the IV. A third regression was run including visual cues and public self- awareness, as well as controlling for group size and cognitive effort. To further test the relationship between visual cues and public self-awareness, a regression was run using public self-awareness as the DV and visual cues as IV, controlling for group size, private self- awareness, and cognitive effort. The final calculation was the partial correlation between perceived self-anonymity and visual cues, while controlling for public self-awareness. Several of the measures included in the study could be highly correlated with visual cues. To test for multicollinearity (correlation among independent variables) I computed the variance inflation factors (Stevens, 1996). As a benchmark, I followed Myers (1990) suggestion that the numerical value of these factors should be under 10. All analyses were done using SPSS version 10.0 Results. Table 1 shows the correlation table. As expected, the perceived anonymity and self- awareness measures were negative and significantly correlated. Interestingly, prior knowledge of others was not significantly related to perceived anonymity of self and public self-awareness. However, it is significantly correlated with perceived anonymity of others. In separate analysis, prior knowledge was included as a control variable regressed on perceived self-anonymity, and was found to be non-significant.

Authors: Gomez, Luis.
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Visual Cues and Perceived Self-Anonymity
14
The test for mediation in this study was based on regressions to check for the three
conditions. First, a regression was done with visual cues as independent variable and visual cues,
as the DV. On this first regression, group size and cognitive effort were included as control
variables. A second regression was then run with perceived self-anonymity as the DV and public
self-awareness as the IV. A third regression was run including visual cues and public self-
awareness, as well as controlling for group size and cognitive effort. To further test the
relationship between visual cues and public self-awareness, a regression was run using public
self-awareness as the DV and visual cues as IV, controlling for group size, private self-
awareness, and cognitive effort. The final calculation was the partial correlation between
perceived self-anonymity and visual cues, while controlling for public self-awareness. Several
of the measures included in the study could be highly correlated with visual cues. To test for
multicollinearity (correlation among independent variables) I computed the variance inflation
factors (Stevens, 1996). As a benchmark, I followed Myers (1990) suggestion that the numerical
value of these factors should be under 10. All analyses were done using SPSS version 10.0
Results.
Table 1 shows the correlation table. As expected, the perceived anonymity and self-
awareness measures were negative and significantly correlated. Interestingly, prior knowledge of
others was not significantly related to perceived anonymity of self and public self-awareness.
However, it is significantly correlated with perceived anonymity of others. In separate analysis,
prior knowledge was included as a control variable regressed on perceived self-anonymity, and
was found to be non-significant.


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