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Effects of visual cues on public self-awareness and perceived anonymity of self
Unformatted Document Text:  Visual Cues and Perceived Self-Anonymity 16 related to perceived anonymity, implying that there are no effects of visual cues once the experiment controlled for source anonymity. Hypothesis 2 considers the possibility that public self-awareness mediates the relationship between visual cues and perceived anonymity of self. Because of the lack of support for Hypothesis 1, visual cues were not found to affect perceived self-anonymity and thus public self- awareness can not mediate a relationship that does not exist. Thus, Hypothesis 2 was also not supported. Nevertheless, public self-awareness was related to perceived self-anonymity ( =- .579, <.001). In a third regression including both visual cues and the two control variables (group size, and cognitive effort) public self-awareness found to be the strongest predictor of perceived self-anonymity ( =-.574, <.001). Table 2 shows the results of this regression. Separate analysis also indicated that private self-awareness was not a significant predictor of perceived self-anonymity ( =-.109, =.5). A subsequent regression with public self-awareness as the dependent variable; and visual manipulation as the ID, controlling for group size and cognitive effort, showed that the effects of the visual manipulation ( =.343, <.024) and cognitive effort ( =.327, <.031) on public self-awareness were significant at the p<.05 level. Table 2 Regression with perceived self-anonymity as DV. B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant, Kiesler, & Sproull) 5.528 .994 5.561 .000 Visuall -6.698E-02 .286 -.034 -.234 .816 Group Size -2.128E-02 .111 -.026 -.191 .849 Cog Eff 1.565E-02 .113 .020 .138 .891 Pub_S_Aw -.506 .132 -.574 -3.840 .000

Authors: Gomez, Luis.
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Visual Cues and Perceived Self-Anonymity
16
related to perceived anonymity, implying that there are no effects of visual cues once the
experiment controlled for source anonymity.
Hypothesis 2 considers the possibility that public self-awareness mediates the relationship
between visual cues and perceived anonymity of self. Because of the lack of support for
Hypothesis 1, visual cues were not found to affect perceived self-anonymity and thus public self-
awareness can not mediate a relationship that does not exist. Thus, Hypothesis 2 was also not
supported. Nevertheless, public self-awareness was related to perceived self-anonymity ( =-
.579, <.001). In a third regression including both visual cues and the two control variables
(group size, and cognitive effort) public self-awareness found to be the strongest predictor of
perceived self-anonymity ( =-.574, <.001). Table 2 shows the results of this regression.
Separate analysis also indicated that private self-awareness was not a significant predictor of
perceived self-anonymity ( =-.109, =.5). A subsequent regression with public self-awareness
as the dependent variable; and visual manipulation as the ID, controlling for group size and
cognitive effort, showed that the effects of the visual manipulation ( =.343, <.024) and
cognitive effort ( =.327, <.031) on public self-awareness were significant at the p<.05 level.
Table 2
Regression with perceived self-anonymity as DV.
B
Std. Error
Beta
t
Sig.
(Constant,
Kiesler, &
Sproull)
5.528
.994
5.561
.000
Visuall
-6.698E-02
.286
-.034
-.234
.816
Group Size
-2.128E-02
.111
-.026
-.191
.849
Cog Eff
1.565E-02
.113
.020
.138
.891
Pub_S_Aw
-.506
.132
-.574
-3.840
.000


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