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Effects of visual cues on public self-awareness and perceived anonymity of self
Unformatted Document Text:  Visual Cues and Perceived Self-Anonymity 18 The results show a relationship between public self-awareness and perceived anonymity. Further, they also show a relationship between visual cues and public self-awareness. Thus, although no mediating effects were found here, future research with larger sample sizes would more clearly determine whether visual cues are indirectly related to perceived self-anonymity through public self-awareness. A second limitation of study is the low reliability of the scales. Because this is an exploratory study, the number of items in each scale was small. Thus, further research might redefine this by including a greater number of items for each measure. Some measures that need further refinement relate to both types of perceived anonymity. Because most past studies have focused on anonymity as a manipulation, there are few benchmarks in the literature from which to develop measures of perceived anonymity. Future studies are needed to refine a scale of perceived anonymity. This study shares a limitation with most survey-based research on issues such as self- awareness and perceived anonymity: By asking about self-awareness, the surveys make individuals self-aware. The same happens with perceived anonymity. The individual might not have considered whether he or she was anonymous until he or she was asked about how anonymous he or she was. This implies a self-response bias that might affect the results. Getting around this limitation will help us understand the relationship and differences between anonymity and self-awareness. Future studies of anonymity in groups might require including observations of group interactions as a way to avoid self-response bias. An interesting finding not hypothesized is the relationship between public self-awareness and cognitive effort. This finding is consistent with research on social cognition (Fiske, 1995) that suggest that individual require cognitive resources to engage in individualization. The results

Authors: Gomez, Luis.
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Visual Cues and Perceived Self-Anonymity
18
The results show a relationship between public self-awareness and perceived anonymity.
Further, they also show a relationship between visual cues and public self-awareness. Thus,
although no mediating effects were found here, future research with larger sample sizes would
more clearly determine whether visual cues are indirectly related to perceived self-anonymity
through public self-awareness.
A second limitation of study is the low reliability of the scales. Because this is an
exploratory study, the number of items in each scale was small. Thus, further research might
redefine this by including a greater number of items for each measure. Some measures that need
further refinement relate to both types of perceived anonymity. Because most past studies have
focused on anonymity as a manipulation, there are few benchmarks in the literature from which
to develop measures of perceived anonymity. Future studies are needed to refine a scale of
perceived anonymity.
This study shares a limitation with most survey-based research on issues such as self-
awareness and perceived anonymity: By asking about self-awareness, the surveys make
individuals self-aware. The same happens with perceived anonymity. The individual might not
have considered whether he or she was anonymous until he or she was asked about how
anonymous he or she was. This implies a self-response bias that might affect the results.
Getting around this limitation will help us understand the relationship and differences between
anonymity and self-awareness. Future studies of anonymity in groups might require including
observations of group interactions as a way to avoid self-response bias.
An interesting finding not hypothesized is the relationship between public self-awareness
and cognitive effort. This finding is consistent with research on social cognition (Fiske, 1995)
that suggest that individual require cognitive resources to engage in individualization. The results


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