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A Study of Agenda-Setting Theory in Presidential Debates in Mexico’s 2000 Presidential Campaign

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Abstract:

The 2000 Presidential election in Mexico, won by opposition candidate Vicente Fox, ended 71 years of rule of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). Content analysis of television coverage of presidential debates during the Mexican election in 2000 showed that first-level and second-level agenda setting theory explains the role that the media played during that contest. Coverage of the two presidential debates was illustrative of how effective the media were in setting the agenda for discussion on issues and candidate attributes during the campaign. Videotapes of television newscats were content analyzed, as were the television debates themselves. The study replicated findings of prior studies of the agenda-setting function: the media (television news) agenda prior to the debates was highly correlated with the content of the debates themselves.Data from a panel study conducted at the time of the campaign showed a high correspondence between media content and public perceptions of issues and candidate traits. This correspondence was more evident when analyzing candidate image. Overall media coverage was centered on candidate image rather than issues; consequently, the public perceptions of candidates were also centered on image attributes rather than campaign issues.

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debat (159), candid (156), attribut (118), issu (113), media (92), imag (90), public (84), coverag (76), agenda (74), content (73), campaign (72), televis (51), news (46), correl (45), elect (45), 2000 (44), import (44), mexico (41), relationship (40), hypothesi (39), studi (37),

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Mexico agenda-setting image issues content analysis
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MLA Citation:

Mercado, Antonieta., Hellweg, Susan., Dozier, David. and Hofstetter, C.. "A Study of Agenda-Setting Theory in Presidential Debates in Mexico’s 2000 Presidential Campaign" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111490_index.html>

APA Citation:

Mercado, A. , Hellweg, S. , Dozier, D. M. and Hofstetter, C. R. , 2003-05-27 "A Study of Agenda-Setting Theory in Presidential Debates in Mexico’s 2000 Presidential Campaign" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111490_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The 2000 Presidential election in Mexico, won by opposition candidate Vicente Fox, ended 71 years of rule of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). Content analysis of television coverage of presidential debates during the Mexican election in 2000 showed that first-level and second-level agenda setting theory explains the role that the media played during that contest. Coverage of the two presidential debates was illustrative of how effective the media were in setting the agenda for discussion on issues and candidate attributes during the campaign. Videotapes of television newscats were content analyzed, as were the television debates themselves. The study replicated findings of prior studies of the agenda-setting function: the media (television news) agenda prior to the debates was highly correlated with the content of the debates themselves.Data from a panel study conducted at the time of the campaign showed a high correspondence between media content and public perceptions of issues and candidate traits. This correspondence was more evident when analyzing candidate image. Overall media coverage was centered on candidate image rather than issues; consequently, the public perceptions of candidates were also centered on image attributes rather than campaign issues.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 38
Word count: 8579
Text sample:
A Study of Agenda-Setting Theory in Presidential Debates in Mexico’s 2000 Presidential Campaign Paper submitted to the Political Communication Division International Communication Association Annual Convention San Diego CA. May 2003 2 Abstract A Study of Agenda-Setting Theory in Presidential Debates in Mexico’s 2000 Presidential Campaign The 2000 Presidential election in Mexico won by opposition candidate Vicente Fox ended 71 years of rule of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). Content analysis of television coverage of presidential debates during the Mexican
debate. Communication Monographs 45 347-353. Takeshita O. (1997). Exploring the media’s roles in defining reality: From issue-agenda setting to attribute-agenda setting. In M. McCombs D.L. Shaw & D. Weaver (Eds.) Communication and democracy: Exploring the intellectual frontiers in agenda-setting theory (pp. 15-27). Mahwah NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Trent J. S. & Friedenberg R. V. (1995). Political campaign rd communication: Principles and practices (3 ed.). Westport CT: Praeger. Zakahi W. R. & Hacker K. L. (1995). Televised presidential debates and candidate


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