All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A Study of Agenda-Setting Theory in Presidential Debates in Mexico’s 2000 Presidential Campaign
Unformatted Document Text:  6 communication on campaigns, the primary providers of information to opinion leaders are the media. In a campaign the news media also formulates and disseminates expectations about what candidates do, will do and should do (Craig, 2000). Carey argues that the media assigns importance to events, issues and communicates it to the public (1976). During political campaigns, the general public witnesses political events mainly through the mass media, with the television screen now having replaced the political rally as a primary means of getting information regarding the candidates. Thus, candidates today rely more than before on the mass media during their campaigns as a means of spreading their messages to the public. In particular formal, organized debates in political campaigns are very important media events (Berquist & Golden, 1981), probably the most important of all during the campaign because the candidates appear together in a single setting, promoting and defending their projects and ideas before the public. Agenda-setting theory has been used in different ways in analyzing debates in elections. According to Bernard Cohen, the media “may not be successful much of the time in telling people what to think, but it is stunningly successful in telling people what to think about” (1963, p. 13). Maxwell E. McCombs states that the media have an important, cumulative impact on cognitive attitudes and their relevance or salience (1972). The media show the importance of an issue by letting the public know about it; the public learn to use that information and to give it a meaning. Literally, Agenda Setting theory states that “the public judges as important what the media judges as important” (Swanson & Swanson, 1978, p. 347). Media shape in this way the public agenda about current and salient issues. Jackson-Beeck and Meadow suggest at least three agendas involved in the act of debating, the public agenda, the candidates’ agenda, and the media’s agenda. Also they say that

Authors: Mercado, Antonieta., Hellweg, Susan., Dozier, David. and Hofstetter, C..
first   previous   Page 6 of 38   next   last



background image
6
communication on campaigns, the primary providers of
information to opinion leaders are the media. In a campaign
the news media also formulates and disseminates expectations
about what candidates do, will do and should do (Craig, 2000).
Carey argues that the media assigns importance to events,
issues and communicates it to the public (1976). During
political campaigns, the general public witnesses political
events mainly through the mass media, with the television
screen now having replaced the political rally as a primary
means of getting information regarding the candidates. Thus,
candidates today rely more than before on the mass media
during their campaigns as a means of spreading their messages
to the public. In particular formal, organized debates in
political campaigns are very important media events (Berquist
& Golden, 1981), probably the most important of all during the
campaign because the candidates appear together in a single
setting, promoting and defending their projects and ideas
before the public.
Agenda-setting theory has been used in different ways in
analyzing debates in elections. According to Bernard Cohen,
the media “may not be successful much of the time in telling
people what to think, but it is stunningly successful in
telling people what to think about” (1963, p. 13). Maxwell E.
McCombs states that the media have an important, cumulative
impact on cognitive attitudes and their relevance or salience
(1972). The media show the importance of an issue by letting
the public know about it; the public learn to use that
information and to give it a meaning. Literally, Agenda
Setting theory states that “the public judges as important
what the media judges as important” (Swanson & Swanson, 1978,
p. 347). Media shape in this way the public agenda about
current and salient issues.
Jackson-Beeck and Meadow suggest at least three agendas
involved in the act of debating, the public agenda, the
candidates’ agenda, and the media’s agenda. Also they say that


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 38   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.