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Role of Global Media Use on Adolescent Development in South Africa
Unformatted Document Text:  Global Media Use in South Africa XY urban area in South Africa with a population of 3.2 million people as of 1999 (The U. S. Department of Commerce: http://www.tradeport.org/ts/countries/safrica/market.html ). The student age was ranged from 13 to 19, with 90% of the respondents at age 17 or under. 51% of the respondents were females. While South Africa is the richest country in Africa, there are wide income gaps between different ethnic and cultural groups. Although blacks are 77% of the South African population—with whites (11%), colored/mixed race (9%) and Indians (3%) making up the rest, they earn far less compared to other ethnic groups. The students surveyed mostly consisted of minorities, blacks and Indians. The identity measures used for this study took both commitment and exploration into account. For commitment, the questions were asked to evaluate how important it was for each respondent to be who he or she is: a South African, to be of a particular gender, to believe in one’s religion, to be a part of the ethnic or racial group, to use the home language, or to be a teenager. Exploration was measured through questions about the level of appreciation in music, natural beauty, art, people, and values of one’s own culture, after having been exposed to those of foreign origins. These questions, as well as those on global orientation mentioned earlier, were phrased to also account for the role of television, by qualifying the questions so that the respondents would associate what they viewed on television with the questions being asked. This step was taken under the assumption that the media (and especially television) serves as “the very currency through which identity are constructed, social relations negotiated and peer culture generated” (Livingstone, 1998). Adults, with ethnic and cultural identities more firmly established, could be less affected by what is on television.

Authors: Lee, Anselm.
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Global Media Use in South Africa
XY
urban area in South Africa with a population of 3.2 million people as of 1999 (The U. S.
Department of Commerce:
http://www.tradeport.org/ts/countries/safrica/market.html
). The
student age was ranged from 13 to 19, with 90% of the respondents at age 17 or under. 51%
of the respondents were females. While South Africa is the richest country in Africa, there
are wide income gaps between different ethnic and cultural groups. Although blacks are
77% of the South African population—with whites (11%), colored/mixed race (9%) and
Indians (3%) making up the rest, they earn far less compared to other ethnic groups. The
students surveyed mostly consisted of minorities, blacks and Indians.
The identity measures used for this study took both commitment and exploration
into account. For commitment, the questions were asked to evaluate how important it was
for each respondent to be who he or she is: a South African, to be of a particular gender, to
believe in one’s religion, to be a part of the ethnic or racial group, to use the home
language, or to be a teenager. Exploration was measured through questions about the level
of appreciation in music, natural beauty, art, people, and values of one’s own culture, after
having been exposed to those of foreign origins.
These questions, as well as those on global orientation mentioned earlier, were
phrased to also account for the role of television, by qualifying the questions so that the
respondents would associate what they viewed on television with the questions being
asked. This step was taken under the assumption that the media (and especially television)
serves as “the very currency through which identity are constructed, social relations
negotiated and peer culture generated” (Livingstone, 1998). Adults, with ethnic and cultural
identities more firmly established, could be less affected by what is on television.


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