All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Role of Global Media Use on Adolescent Development in South Africa
Unformatted Document Text:  Global Media Use in South Africa XZ Measures on autonomy (from parental influences in using the media) and on socialization (spending time with friends) were taken from an earlier study (Sherry, et a., 1999). It was expected that the self-reporting of parental influences would result in an underestimation, for some teenagers might not wish to own up to be under parental influence. However, one could also interpret the possible underestimation as an indicator of one’s desire to be independent. The socialization measures were taken by asking how many friends the respondent had and by asking detailed questions about how he or she spent time with friends. As anticipated, the latter questions proved to be far more reliable measures of the construct. The study asked the questions regarding one’s perceived familiarity to the U. S. culture to assess whether television viewing creates an idea in the minds of the teenage viewers that what they see on television is how it is in the U. S. Similar to other measures, the questions were qualified with the phrase, “When you watch television programs.” The questions asking one’s attitude towards the U.S. consumer products listed some of the items that are popular among teenagers and asked the respondents to compare them with the analogous domestic products. The television’s influence was tested using three items asking if what one saw on television affected the way he or she thought, felt, or behaved. All sets of measures were tested for their item reliabilities before being computed into indices, and the standardized coefficients (ranging from .67 to .81) are reported in Table 1 (Appendix III).

Authors: Lee, Anselm.
first   previous   Page 13 of 27   next   last



background image
Global Media Use in South Africa
XZ
Measures on autonomy (from parental influences in using the media) and on
socialization (spending time with friends) were taken from an earlier study (Sherry, et a.,
1999). It was expected that the self-reporting of parental influences would result in an
underestimation, for some teenagers might not wish to own up to be under parental
influence. However, one could also interpret the possible underestimation as an indicator of
one’s desire to be independent. The socialization measures were taken by asking how many
friends the respondent had and by asking detailed questions about how he or she spent time
with friends. As anticipated, the latter questions proved to be far more reliable measures of
the construct.
The study asked the questions regarding one’s perceived familiarity to the U. S.
culture to assess whether television viewing creates an idea in the minds of the teenage
viewers that what they see on television is how it is in the U. S. Similar to other measures,
the questions were qualified with the phrase, “When you watch television programs.” The
questions asking one’s attitude towards the U.S. consumer products listed some of the items
that are popular among teenagers and asked the respondents to compare them with the
analogous domestic products. The television’s influence was tested using three items asking
if what one saw on television affected the way he or she thought, felt, or behaved. All sets
of measures were tested for their item reliabilities before being computed into indices, and
the standardized coefficients (ranging from .67 to .81) are reported in Table 1 (Appendix
III).


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 13 of 27   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.