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Role of Global Media Use on Adolescent Development in South Africa
Unformatted Document Text:  Global Media Use in South Africa Z benefits from previous uses (gratifications obtained) to adjust their expectations. While it inherits the active audience assumption from the uses and gratifications approach (Blumler & Katz, 1974; Levy & Windahl, 1984; Rosengren et a., 1985), the theory places added emphasis on the repeated evaluation procedures individuals perform in its explanation of repeated or changing media use patterns. The expectancy-value theory stresses the weight of previously held beliefs in determining gratifications sought. In other words, rather than performing a specific analysis of motivations and expected gratifications each time one needs to make a choice of media, individuals could fall back on previous experiences and show a habitual, ritualized media use behavior (Rubin, 1984). Media use during adolescence Adolescence is a period in which one goes through rapid physical, emotional and social changes, which unavoidably bring conflicts and turmoil to the developmental process (Wagner, 1996). Consequently, as Rosengren and Windahl (1989) noted, there have been recurring concerns that each new medium or new media genre might “corrupt the minds and the lives of children and adolescents” (xv). Such concerns, however, are not the only reasons for studying adolescents’ media use. Rather, most of the teenagers manage the period of adolescence very well (Offer, et a., 1989) and there have been research works focusing on how the use of communication media might positively contribute to such management processes (Roe, 1985; Brown & Hendee, 1989). These consider media use during adolescence as part of the “developmental process by which young people acquire the knowledge, attitudes, and skills relevant to their functioning” (Atkin, 1982: 191) and assume it as being goal-directed.

Authors: Lee, Anselm.
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Global Media Use in South Africa
Z
benefits from previous uses (gratifications obtained) to adjust their expectations. While it
inherits the active audience assumption from the uses and gratifications approach (Blumler
& Katz, 1974; Levy & Windahl, 1984; Rosengren et a., 1985), the theory places added
emphasis on the repeated evaluation procedures individuals perform in its explanation of
repeated or changing media use patterns. The expectancy-value theory stresses the weight
of previously held beliefs in determining gratifications sought. In other words, rather than
performing a specific analysis of motivations and expected gratifications each time one
needs to make a choice of media, individuals could fall back on previous experiences and
show a habitual, ritualized media use behavior (Rubin, 1984).
Media use during adolescence
Adolescence is a period in which one goes through rapid physical, emotional and
social changes, which unavoidably bring conflicts and turmoil to the developmental process
(Wagner, 1996). Consequently, as Rosengren and Windahl (1989) noted, there have been
recurring concerns that each new medium or new media genre might “corrupt the minds
and the lives of children and adolescents” (xv). Such concerns, however, are not the only
reasons for studying adolescents’ media use. Rather, most of the teenagers manage the
period of adolescence very well (Offer, et a., 1989) and there have been research works
focusing on how the use of communication media might positively contribute to such
management processes (Roe, 1985; Brown & Hendee, 1989). These consider media use
during adolescence as part of the “developmental process by which young people acquire
the knowledge, attitudes, and skills relevant to their functioning” (Atkin, 1982: 191) and
assume it as being goal-directed.


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