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Role of Global Media Use on Adolescent Development in South Africa
Unformatted Document Text:  Global Media Use in South Africa ^ advance a single task appear to be enough to motivate one to seek information or stimulation from media. Minority adolescents’ preference to watch programs on which their own ethnic group members are prominently featured (Greenberg & Brand, 1994) would gratify the needs in advancing the identity task. Simply preferring the media content with characters their own age (Harwood, 1997) would be a similar example. Often, however, it is a combination of multiple tasks that creates the needs that could be satisfied by specific media choices. For instance, magazine use could be related to the needs related to the sexuality and the intimacy tasks (hoping to learn about boys and relationships) for adolescent girls (Evans et a., 1991). The global influence of U. S. consumer culture The term globalization implies “both compression of the world and the intensification of consciousness of the world as a whole” (Robertson, 1992). These two related developments would lead to a network of diverse relationships (Hannerz, 1990) that we call global society. Having a network of social relationship does not necessarily mean the global society will end up sharing homogenous lifestyles and cultural values. Hannerz (1990, 237) noted that global culture is “marked by an organization of diversity rather than by a replication of uniformity.” Similarly, van Elteren (1996) saw globalization as interplays between various sets of dichotomous actions, such as integration and fragmentation, integration and diversification, and so forth. South African television offers a considerable quantity of foreign programs. The U. S. programs such as Days of Our Lives, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, Buffy the Vampire

Authors: Lee, Anselm.
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Global Media Use in South Africa
^
advance a single task appear to be enough to motivate one to seek information or
stimulation from media. Minority adolescents’ preference to watch programs on which their
own ethnic group members are prominently featured (Greenberg & Brand, 1994) would
gratify the needs in advancing the identity task. Simply preferring the media content with
characters their own age (Harwood, 1997) would be a similar example. Often, however, it is
a combination of multiple tasks that creates the needs that could be satisfied by specific
media choices. For instance, magazine use could be related to the needs related to the
sexuality and the intimacy tasks (hoping to learn about boys and relationships) for
adolescent girls (Evans et a., 1991).
The global influence of U. S. consumer culture
The term globalization implies “both compression of the world and the
intensification of consciousness of the world as a whole” (Robertson, 1992). These two
related developments would lead to a network of diverse relationships (Hannerz, 1990) that
we call global society. Having a network of social relationship does not necessarily mean
the global society will end up sharing homogenous lifestyles and cultural values. Hannerz
(1990, 237) noted that global culture is “marked by an organization of diversity rather than
by a replication of uniformity.” Similarly, van Elteren (1996) saw globalization as
interplays between various sets of dichotomous actions, such as integration and
fragmentation, integration and diversification, and so forth.
South African television offers a considerable quantity of foreign programs. The U.
S. programs such as Days of Our Lives, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, Buffy the Vampire


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