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Expanding the Reach of Health Campaigns: Can Community Organizations Serve as Viable Channels of Health Information?
Unformatted Document Text:  Expanding the Reach 11 from a lower-order (e.g., precontemplation) to a higher-order stage (contemplation). Even though many researchers have raised significant critiques of this theory (e.g., Bandura, 2000), the important point is that many cognitive changes that propel individuals to modify their behaviors remain undetectable if only overt behaviors are measured. Second, a campaign-induced improvement in known behavioral precursors is also an indication of campaign success. Gain in knowledge about health as a result of exposure to a campaign. Possessing the requisite knowledge base, of course, does not always translate into behavior. Without knowledge about risks and the means to reducing them, however, behavior change is less likely to occur. Hence, to the extent that a campaign results in knowledge gain, we can conclude that the campaign has facilitated behavior change. For these reasons, we have conceptualized health knowledge as a viable and valid health outcome. Method Data for this study come from the Stanford Five-City Project (FCP), a long-term public health intervention in California. In 1979-1980, all persons 12 through 74 years of age who resided in randomly selected households were invited to participate in FCP evaluation efforts. Individuals reported to local testing sites where they completed an extensive questionnaire concerning their communication activities, attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors; various physiological measures were also obtained (Farquhar et al., 1985). This procedure was adopted approximately every other year, resulting in five cross-sectional data waves. In this study, we report findings from these cross-sectional data waves (collected in 1979, 1981, 1983, 1985, and 1989), collapsed into one large dataset. Even though the FCP campaign also collected longitudinal data waves, because of data constraints, they are not included in this paper. Variables

Authors: Stephens, Keri., Rimal, Rajiv. and Flora, June.
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Expanding the Reach 11
from a lower-order (e.g., precontemplation) to a higher-order stage (contemplation). Even
though many researchers have raised significant critiques of this theory (e.g., Bandura, 2000), the
important point is that many cognitive changes that propel individuals to modify their behaviors
remain undetectable if only overt behaviors are measured. Second, a campaign-induced
improvement in known behavioral precursors is also an indication of campaign success. Gain in
knowledge about health as a result of exposure to a campaign. Possessing the requisite
knowledge base, of course, does not always translate into behavior. Without knowledge about
risks and the means to reducing them, however, behavior change is less likely to occur. Hence,
to the extent that a campaign results in knowledge gain, we can conclude that the campaign has
facilitated behavior change. For these reasons, we have conceptualized health knowledge as a
viable and valid health outcome.
Method
Data for this study come from the Stanford Five-City Project (FCP), a long-term public
health intervention in California. In 1979-1980, all persons 12 through 74 years of age who
resided in randomly selected households were invited to participate in FCP evaluation efforts.
Individuals reported to local testing sites where they completed an extensive questionnaire
concerning their communication activities, attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors; various
physiological measures were also obtained (Farquhar et al., 1985). This procedure was adopted
approximately every other year, resulting in five cross-sectional data waves. In this study, we
report findings from these cross-sectional data waves (collected in 1979, 1981, 1983, 1985, and
1989), collapsed into one large dataset. Even though the FCP campaign also collected
longitudinal data waves, because of data constraints, they are not included in this paper.
Variables


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