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Expanding the Reach of Health Campaigns: Can Community Organizations Serve as Viable Channels of Health Information?
Unformatted Document Text:  Expanding the Reach 15 correlations among these variables, test of the first hypothesis was conducted through a multivariate design, as discussed below. Hypothesis H1 Our first hypothesis predicted that education, age, gender, newspaper reading, television viewing, and health information seeking would be associated with membership in community organizations. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted hierarchical regression equations by first controlling for the secular trend. Results, shown in Table 2, indicate that the secular trend, which was entered in the first step of the equation, accounted for 2 percent of the variance in membership (p < .0001). In the second step, we entered demographic measures, which accounted for an additional 8 percent of the variance (p < .0001). Given our prior discussion about the curvilinear relationship between age and organizational membership, we entered both a linear as well as a quadratic (the squared term) term for age. Whereas the linear term was not significant ( β = -.08, p > .05), the quadratic term was ( β = .22, p < .0001). Examination of the means revealed that the quadratic function was concave and that the minimal value occurred at age 30. Hence, it appears that membership in community organizations is high at young adulthood, becomes minimal at about 30 years of age, and rises thereafter. Table 2 also shows that education was positively correlated with membership in community organizations ( β = .25, p < .0001), as was being male ( β = .04, p < .0001). Our first hypothesis was thus supported. Table 2 Predictors of Organizational Membership from Regression Equations ____________________________________________________________________________ Predictors β 1 a β 2 b ∆ R 2 (%) c

Authors: Stephens, Keri., Rimal, Rajiv. and Flora, June.
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Expanding the Reach 15
correlations among these variables, test of the first hypothesis was conducted through a
multivariate design, as discussed below.
Hypothesis H1
Our first hypothesis predicted that education, age, gender, newspaper reading, television
viewing, and health information seeking would be associated with membership in community
organizations. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted hierarchical regression equations by
first controlling for the secular trend. Results, shown in Table 2, indicate that the secular trend,
which was entered in the first step of the equation, accounted for 2 percent of the variance in
membership (p < .0001). In the second step, we entered demographic measures, which
accounted for an additional 8 percent of the variance (p < .0001). Given our prior discussion
about the curvilinear relationship between age and organizational membership, we entered both a
linear as well as a quadratic (the squared term) term for age. Whereas the linear term was not
significant (
β
= -.08, p > .05), the quadratic term was (
β
= .22, p < .0001). Examination of the
means revealed that the quadratic function was concave and that the minimal value occurred at
age 30. Hence, it appears that membership in community organizations is high at young
adulthood, becomes minimal at about 30 years of age, and rises thereafter. Table 2 also shows
that education was positively correlated with membership in community organizations (
β
= .25,
p < .0001), as was being male (
β
= .04, p < .0001). Our first hypothesis was thus supported.
Table 2
Predictors of Organizational Membership from Regression Equations
____________________________________________________________________________
Predictors
β
1
a
β
2
b
R
2
(%)
c


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