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Expanding the Reach of Health Campaigns: Can Community Organizations Serve as Viable Channels of Health Information?
Unformatted Document Text:  Expanding the Reach 2 (Note to reviewers: To facilitate the review of this manuscript on the computer screen, we have departed from APA style and embedded the figures and tables within the text of the manuscript.) Expanding the Reach of Health Campaigns: Can Community Organizations Serve as Viable Channels of Health Information? Health campaigns cannot succeed in changing individuals’ behaviors without achieving widespread exposure to their messages (Hornik, 2002; Rimal, Flora, & Schooler (1999), Rogers & Storey, 1987). Exposure can be maximized through the use of multiple channels (Baker & Rogers, 1993, Flora, Saphir, Schooler, & Rimal, 1997; Flynn, Worden, Secker-Walker, Badger, Geller, & Costanza, 1992; Rogers & Storey, 1987). In the health communication literature, channels are typically conceptualized as either mass media or interpersonal in nature, and campaigns are urged to adopt a realistic mixture of both (Baker & Rogers, 1993, Rogers & Story, 1987). Less often, however, are individuals’ organizational and community memberships taken as viable channels for the dissemination of campaign messages. Baker and Rogers (1993) point out, for example, that “the literature on health communication campaigns is curiously silent on the subject of organizations” (p. 3). Some research has shown that community organizations can be key players in the success of a campaign (Flora, Jatilus, Jackson, and Fortmann, 1993, Rogers, 1993). Data from the Stanford Five City Project (Farquhar, Fortmann, Maccoby, Haskell, Williams, Flora, Taylor, Brown, Solomon, & Hulley, 1985) found that “organizations other than the media have the potential for reaching almost half of the households in a community” (Flora et al., 1993, p. 122). Although the limited data suggest the usefulness of organizations, particularly in their reach, what we currently lack is an understanding of how that reach translates into desirable campaign outcomes.

Authors: Stephens, Keri., Rimal, Rajiv. and Flora, June.
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Expanding the Reach 2
(Note to reviewers: To facilitate the review of this manuscript on the computer screen, we
have departed from APA style and embedded the figures and tables within the text of the
manuscript.)
Expanding the Reach of Health Campaigns:
Can Community Organizations Serve as Viable Channels of Health Information?
Health campaigns cannot succeed in changing individuals’ behaviors without achieving
widespread exposure to their messages (Hornik, 2002; Rimal, Flora, & Schooler (1999), Rogers
& Storey, 1987). Exposure can be maximized through the use of multiple channels (Baker &
Rogers, 1993, Flora, Saphir, Schooler, & Rimal, 1997; Flynn, Worden, Secker-Walker, Badger,
Geller, & Costanza, 1992; Rogers & Storey, 1987). In the health communication literature,
channels are typically conceptualized as either mass media or interpersonal in nature, and
campaigns are urged to adopt a realistic mixture of both (Baker & Rogers, 1993, Rogers & Story,
1987). Less often, however, are individuals’ organizational and community memberships taken
as viable channels for the dissemination of campaign messages. Baker and Rogers (1993) point
out, for example, that “the literature on health communication campaigns is curiously silent on
the subject of organizations” (p. 3). Some research has shown that community organizations can
be key players in the success of a campaign (Flora, Jatilus, Jackson, and Fortmann, 1993,
Rogers, 1993). Data from the Stanford Five City Project (Farquhar, Fortmann, Maccoby,
Haskell, Williams, Flora, Taylor, Brown, Solomon, & Hulley, 1985) found that “organizations
other than the media have the potential for reaching almost half of the households in a
community” (Flora et al., 1993, p. 122). Although the limited data suggest the usefulness of
organizations, particularly in their reach, what we currently lack is an understanding of how that
reach translates into desirable campaign outcomes.


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