All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Expanding the Reach of Health Campaigns: Can Community Organizations Serve as Viable Channels of Health Information?
Unformatted Document Text:  Expanding the Reach 22 collected. Putnam (1995) does suggest that the post-war generation was characterized by its civic engagement and that participation in community organizations has declined among subsequent generations. Longitudinal studies would be needed to affirm this finding, and we are unable to comment on it from our data. Perhaps the most significant finding of this study is that the channel of community organizations emerges as a predictor of campaign-related knowledge acquisition. We noted that a case could be made for the use of community organizations only if we could demonstrate that reliance on them would provide outcomes above and beyond those already achieved through other, traditional means. In particular, we needed to demonstrate that membership in community organizations would account for knowledge acquisition even after the effects of known predictors were taken into account. Hence, we first controlled for the effects of secular trends, demographic indicators, media use, and health information seeking. Even then, membership in community organizations was able to explain additional variance in knowledge, thus indicating that it was not redundant with channels that individuals were already using for acquiring health information. Limitations and Future Directions Although this study suggests that health campaign designers should consider organizations as viable distribution channels, there are some limitations that exist. First, this study relied on cross-sectional data, and hence the temporal ordering of the primary concepts – social capital and health outcomes – has to be determined more conclusively. In addition, this study relied on self-report data, which can introduce a social desirability bias. It is possible that individuals reported higher levels of memberships than they actually maintained. However, because the largest total memberships reported was three, this is not very likely. A more likely

Authors: Stephens, Keri., Rimal, Rajiv. and Flora, June.
first   previous   Page 22 of 30   next   last



background image
Expanding the Reach 22
collected. Putnam (1995) does suggest that the post-war generation was characterized by its
civic engagement and that participation in community organizations has declined among
subsequent generations. Longitudinal studies would be needed to affirm this finding, and we are
unable to comment on it from our data.
Perhaps the most significant finding of this study is that the channel of community
organizations emerges as a predictor of campaign-related knowledge acquisition. We noted that
a case could be made for the use of community organizations only if we could demonstrate that
reliance on them would provide outcomes above and beyond those already achieved through
other, traditional means. In particular, we needed to demonstrate that membership in community
organizations would account for knowledge acquisition even after the effects of known
predictors were taken into account. Hence, we first controlled for the effects of secular trends,
demographic indicators, media use, and health information seeking. Even then, membership in
community organizations was able to explain additional variance in knowledge, thus indicating
that it was not redundant with channels that individuals were already using for acquiring health
information.
Limitations and Future Directions
Although this study suggests that health campaign designers should consider
organizations as viable distribution channels, there are some limitations that exist. First, this
study relied on cross-sectional data, and hence the temporal ordering of the primary concepts –
social capital and health outcomes – has to be determined more conclusively. In addition, this
study relied on self-report data, which can introduce a social desirability bias. It is possible that
individuals reported higher levels of memberships than they actually maintained. However,
because the largest total memberships reported was three, this is not very likely. A more likely


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 22 of 30   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.