All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Expanding the Reach of Health Campaigns: Can Community Organizations Serve as Viable Channels of Health Information?
Unformatted Document Text:  Expanding the Reach 23 bias to the closed-response questions used in the study is that the named organizations were not inclusive of all potential community organizations. It is possible that there were study participants who were members of community organizations that were not listed on the questionnaire. Furthermore, because the same questions were asked over a decade, the popularity of the listed organizations might have changed. Putnam (2000) claims that these shifts in the popularity of community organizations are not uncommon and they create a challenge for researchers conducting longitudinal work. We should also note that, although exposure is a necessary first step for campaign effects, other cognitive (e.g., self-efficacy) and motivational factors must also be present to achieve changes in behaviors, especially if the behaviors in question are habitual in nature. In such cases, the affinity function of community organizations may serve as the primary agent of change. It is possible that certain types of organizations are better dissemination vehicles than others. This approach is worth pursuing, especially for health campaigns that target a specific audience and need social and reinforcement support to create behavior changes. For example, if the health campaign is targeting pregnant women, there are specific organizations that have access to women in that condition. These are organizations such as Planned Parenthood, women’s shelters, and obstetrician offices. It makes sense to target resources toward the organizations that have access to the campaign targets and provide a reliable channel for information dissemination. It is through the affinity function that members can provide the social support for one another that might create behavior changes. Whereas that example is fairly clear, other types of health campaigns might need to search more deeply for organizations that are likely to house their desired demographic and are willing to disseminate information.

Authors: Stephens, Keri., Rimal, Rajiv. and Flora, June.
first   previous   Page 23 of 30   next   last



background image
Expanding the Reach 23
bias to the closed-response questions used in the study is that the named organizations were not
inclusive of all potential community organizations. It is possible that there were study
participants who were members of community organizations that were not listed on the
questionnaire. Furthermore, because the same questions were asked over a decade, the
popularity of the listed organizations might have changed. Putnam (2000) claims that these
shifts in the popularity of community organizations are not uncommon and they create a
challenge for researchers conducting longitudinal work.
We should also note that, although exposure is a necessary first step for campaign effects,
other cognitive (e.g., self-efficacy) and motivational factors must also be present to achieve
changes in behaviors, especially if the behaviors in question are habitual in nature. In such
cases, the affinity function of community organizations may serve as the primary agent of
change. It is possible that certain types of organizations are better dissemination vehicles than
others. This approach is worth pursuing, especially for health campaigns that target a specific
audience and need social and reinforcement support to create behavior changes. For example, if
the health campaign is targeting pregnant women, there are specific organizations that have
access to women in that condition. These are organizations such as Planned Parenthood,
women’s shelters, and obstetrician offices. It makes sense to target resources toward the
organizations that have access to the campaign targets and provide a reliable channel for
information dissemination. It is through the affinity function that members can provide the
social support for one another that might create behavior changes. Whereas that example is fairly
clear, other types of health campaigns might need to search more deeply for organizations that
are likely to house their desired demographic and are willing to disseminate information.


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 23 of 30   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.