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Beyond Access: Digital divide, Internet Use and Gratifications Gained
Unformatted Document Text:  R ETHINKING THE D IGITAL D IVIDE 10 items ( α = .62). Respondents were asked if they ever did any of the following when they went online: 1) get information about travel, such as checking airline ticket prices or hotel rates, 2) buy a product online, such as books, music, toys or clothing, and 3) buy or make a reservation for a travel service, like an airline ticket, hotel room, or rental car. Computer-mediated interaction was measured by three addictive items ( α = .57). Respondents were asked if they ever did any of the following when they went online: 1) send “instant messages” to someone who’s online at the same time, 2) take part in “chat rooms” or online discussions with other people, and 3) play a game online. The somewhat low alphas are not viewed as a threat to validity since some of these behaviors may preclude or displace others. Criterion Variables. For Internet use gratification, we used a battery of items tapping how much respondents think the Internet has improved diverse abilities. Based on factor analysis, three gratifications were identified: gratification related to social connection, learning, and acquisition. Subsequent test for reliability of each index indicates acceptable values for Cronbach’s alpha and mean inter-item correlation. Connection gratification was calculated by summing up the scores of two items: connections to members of your family and connections to your friends ( α = .70). Learning gratification was measured by two items ( α = .54). Respondents were asked how much the Internet has improved the way they get information about health care and their ability to learn about new things. Acquisition gratification was measured by two items as well: ability to shop and the way respondents manage their finances ( α = .52). Analytic Framework First, we employed structural equation modeling techniques with the whole sample. This will provide overall pattern of how types of Internet use are associated with various gratifications

Authors: Cho, Jaeho., Zuniga, Homero Gil de., Nah, Seungahn., Humane, Abhiyan., Hwang, Hyunseo., Rojas, Hernando. and Shah, Dhavan.
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background image
R
ETHINKING THE
D
IGITAL
D
IVIDE
10
items (
α
= .62). Respondents were asked if they ever did any of the following when they went
online: 1) get information about travel, such as checking airline ticket prices or hotel rates, 2) buy a
product online, such as books, music, toys or clothing, and 3) buy or make a reservation for a travel
service, like an airline ticket, hotel room, or rental car. Computer-mediated interaction was
measured by three addictive items (
α
= .57). Respondents were asked if they ever did any of the
following when they went online: 1) send “instant messages” to someone who’s online at the same
time, 2) take part in “chat rooms” or online discussions with other people, and 3) play a game
online. The somewhat low alphas are not viewed as a threat to validity since some of these
behaviors may preclude or displace others.
Criterion Variables. For Internet use gratification, we used a battery of items tapping how
much respondents think the Internet has improved diverse abilities. Based on factor analysis, three
gratifications were identified: gratification related to social connection, learning, and acquisition.
Subsequent test for reliability of each index indicates acceptable values for Cronbach’s alpha and
mean inter-item correlation. Connection gratification was calculated by summing up the scores of
two items: connections to members of your family and connections to your friends (
α
= .70).
Learning gratification was measured by two items (
α
= .54). Respondents were asked how much
the Internet has improved the way they get information about health care and their ability to learn
about new things. Acquisition gratification was measured by two items as well: ability to shop and
the way respondents manage their finances (
α
= .52).
Analytic Framework
First, we employed structural equation modeling techniques with the whole sample. This
will provide overall pattern of how types of Internet use are associated with various gratifications


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