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Beyond Access: Digital divide, Internet Use and Gratifications Gained
Unformatted Document Text:  R ETHINKING THE D IGITAL D IVIDE 8 Since then, different research has focused a relatively narrow set of gratifications sought: Eighmey and McCord (1998) emphasize informational and social uses; Korgaonkar and Wolin (1999) add entertainment and escapism; Ko (2002) supplements this with diversion, and interactivity. Leading contemporary uses and gratifications scholars (see Ferguson & Perse, 2000, Kaye & Johnson, 2002; Papacharissi & Rubin, 2000) focus on entertainment, diversion, relaxation, social utility, interpersonal interaction, and informational functions. Albeit interesting, research has only related motivations with certain uses, with the gratifications gained from these uses remaining unclear, especially within the context of the digital divide, which is the focus of this paper. Accordingly, we state our primary research question: RQ1: Within the context of digital divide, as defined by age and socio-economic status, how do different patterns of Internet use relate to specific gratifications gained from these uses? Methods Data The data analyzed in this study were collected as a part of the Pew Internet and American Life Study in 2000. Telephone interviews were conducted with a probability sample of 43,224 adults, 18 years of age or older over the year of 2000. A variant of random digit dialing was used in order to include unlisted numbers in the sample (see Pew Internet and American Life Study 2000 for more details). The Year 2000 Tracking Dataset catalogues the attitudes and activities of Americans who used the Internet. Data collected particularly in March 2000 were selected for our analyses simply because March data provide the richest sets of measures for Internet activities and gratifications gained. Then, we limited our analyses to those who are Internet users since our main

Authors: Cho, Jaeho., Zuniga, Homero Gil de., Nah, Seungahn., Humane, Abhiyan., Hwang, Hyunseo., Rojas, Hernando. and Shah, Dhavan.
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background image
R
ETHINKING THE
D
IGITAL
D
IVIDE
8
Since then, different research has focused a relatively narrow set of gratifications sought: Eighmey
and McCord (1998) emphasize informational and social uses; Korgaonkar and Wolin (1999) add
entertainment and escapism; Ko (2002) supplements this with diversion, and interactivity.
Leading contemporary uses and gratifications scholars (see Ferguson & Perse, 2000, Kaye &
Johnson, 2002; Papacharissi & Rubin, 2000) focus on entertainment, diversion, relaxation, social
utility, interpersonal interaction, and informational functions. Albeit interesting, research has only
related motivations with certain uses, with the gratifications gained from these uses remaining
unclear, especially within the context of the digital divide, which is the focus of this paper.
Accordingly, we state our primary research question:
RQ1: Within the context of digital divide, as defined by age and socio-economic status, how do
different patterns of Internet use relate to specific gratifications gained from these uses?
Methods
Data
The data analyzed in this study were collected as a part of the Pew Internet and American
Life Study in 2000. Telephone interviews were conducted with a probability sample of 43,224
adults, 18 years of age or older over the year of 2000. A variant of random digit dialing was used in
order to include unlisted numbers in the sample (see Pew Internet and American Life Study 2000
for more details). The Year 2000 Tracking Dataset catalogues the attitudes and activities of
Americans who used the Internet. Data collected particularly in March 2000 were selected for our
analyses simply because March data provide the richest sets of measures for Internet activities and
gratifications gained. Then, we limited our analyses to those who are Internet users since our main


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