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Antecedents of Proenvironmental Behaviors: An Examination of Cultural Values, Self-Efficacy, and Environmental Attitudes
Unformatted Document Text:  ICA-2-11744 Antecedents of Proenvironmental Behaviors 5 ecological commitments. On the same logic, a negative relationship between individualism and beliefs about resource conservation was evidenced (Dunlap and Van Liere 1984). Contrary to the results form studies in the proceeding review, another stream of research on individualism versus collectivism has suggested a negative relationship between collectivism and proenvironmental behaviors. Stern, Dietz, Kalof, and Guagnano (1995) found a positive relationship between biospheric values and proenvironmental behaviors, which has also been witnessed in several subsequent studies (e.g., Kim 2002; Schultz and Zelezny 1998). Although the relationships were not statistically significant, collectivism was found to exert negative effects on proenvironmental behaviors based on the insignificant relationship between collectivism and biospheric values (Kim 2002). From this view, individuals from collectivistic cultures concern the welfare of members of their own in-group, but they are relatively indifferent to the needs of outsiders, whereas people with individualistic orientations tend not to make a sharp distinction between in-groups and out-groups when responding to needs of others (Triandis 1990; Triandis, McCusker and Hui 1990). Accordingly, people who are more collectivistic place greater emphasis on in-group values such as loyalty, tradition, harmony, and conformity than on biospheric values that apply to interdependence with all living things (e.g., unity with the nature and protection of the environment). In collectivistic cultures, cooperation is high among in-group members, but not with out-group members. This sharp distinction between in-groups and out-groups may negatively influence prosocial behaviors such as proenvironmental behaviors when such

Authors: Kim, Yeonshin. and Choi, Sejung Marina.
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ICA-2-11744 Antecedents of Proenvironmental Behaviors 5
ecological commitments. On the same logic, a negative relationship between
individualism and beliefs about resource conservation was evidenced (Dunlap and Van
Liere 1984).
Contrary to the results form studies in the proceeding review, another stream of
research on individualism versus collectivism has suggested a negative relationship
between collectivism and proenvironmental behaviors. Stern, Dietz, Kalof, and
Guagnano (1995) found a positive relationship between biospheric values and
proenvironmental behaviors, which has also been witnessed in several subsequent studies
(e.g., Kim 2002; Schultz and Zelezny 1998). Although the relationships were not
statistically significant, collectivism was found to exert negative effects on
proenvironmental behaviors based on the insignificant relationship between collectivism
and biospheric values (Kim 2002). From this view, individuals from collectivistic
cultures concern the welfare of members of their own in-group, but they are relatively
indifferent to the needs of outsiders, whereas people with individualistic orientations tend
not to make a sharp distinction between in-groups and out-groups when responding to
needs of others (Triandis 1990; Triandis, McCusker and Hui 1990). Accordingly, people
who are more collectivistic place greater emphasis on in-group values such as loyalty,
tradition, harmony, and conformity than on biospheric values that apply to
interdependence with all living things (e.g., unity with the nature and protection of the
environment).
In collectivistic cultures, cooperation is high among in-group members, but not
with out-group members. This sharp distinction between in-groups and out-groups may
negatively influence prosocial behaviors such as proenvironmental behaviors when such


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