All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

How Given and New Information Shape the Form of Conversational Hand Gestures
Unformatted Document Text:  16 First, the participant rubbed her right palm against her left (an abbreviated version of how she originally did the action), then she pointed her right hand straight up into the air. The rubbing part depicted an action done to the toy, and the pointing depicted a possible trajectory of the whirlygig once released. The first and second part of the gesture blended into one another, and they worked together to communicate the identity and purpose of the toy. Successive gestural depictions Usually participants depicted a previous or possible action with the toy more than once. Often gestures of similar types (such as previously performed actions) were repeated and transformed throughout the exchange. For instance, in group 2, one participant included four different depictions of the action she did with the toy. Repetitions of gestures were also not limited to one participant within the dialogues: often both participants repeated gestures. For example, the participants in group 9 performed ten depictions of the whirlygig action, one of them did three and the other seven. When one or both people used multiple gestures to depict the whirlygig, each gesture was usually different from the last. For instance, although similar, none of the ten depictions shown by group 9 were identical. What influenced the physical form of each depiction? Why would one be different than the next, when each had the same referent? Recall our hypothesis that the physical form of a gesture is influenced by the precise communicative function the gesture is serving at the moment it occurs, in this case, by which information is given or new. According to this hypothesis, multiple gestures depicting the same referent (such as portraying an action the participant did) would be different if each gesture was serving a slightly different communicative function. In fact, given and new information in each gesture could explain the changes in its form. Specifically, each gesture would make the most important, new information most salient and the given information less salient. For instance, if it

Authors: Gerwing, Jennifer.
first   previous   Page 16 of 29   next   last



background image
16
First, the participant rubbed her right palm against her left (an abbreviated version of how she
originally did the action), then she pointed her right hand straight up into the air. The rubbing
part depicted an action done to the toy, and the pointing depicted a possible trajectory of the
whirlygig once released. The first and second part of the gesture blended into one another,
and they worked together to communicate the identity and purpose of the toy.
Successive gestural depictions
Usually participants depicted a previous or possible action with the toy more than once.
Often gestures of similar types (such as previously performed actions) were repeated and
transformed throughout the exchange. For instance, in group 2, one participant included four
different depictions of the action she did with the toy. Repetitions of gestures were also not
limited to one participant within the dialogues: often both participants repeated gestures. For
example, the participants in group 9 performed ten depictions of the whirlygig action, one of
them did three and the other seven. When one or both people used multiple gestures to depict the
whirlygig, each gesture was usually different from the last. For instance, although similar, none
of the ten depictions shown by group 9 were identical. What influenced the physical form of
each depiction? Why would one be different than the next, when each had the same referent?
Recall our hypothesis that the physical form of a gesture is influenced by the precise
communicative function the gesture is serving at the moment it occurs, in this case, by which
information is given or new. According to this hypothesis, multiple gestures depicting the same
referent (such as portraying an action the participant did) would be different if each gesture was
serving a slightly different communicative function. In fact, given and new information in each
gesture could explain the changes in its form. Specifically, each gesture would make the most
important, new information most salient and the given information less salient. For instance, if it


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 16 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.