All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

How Given and New Information Shape the Form of Conversational Hand Gestures
Unformatted Document Text:  22 One participant indicated where the top of the toy was. She had already indicated the location and size of the propellers as well as the stick. In later gestures, although information about the propellers and stick was still conceptually necessary, information about the top of the toy was not. The gesture she performed indicating the top appeared in the immediately following gesture as relevant spatial information, but disappeared from all subsequent gestures both physically and conceptually. By keeping track of the residuals of each gesture through all subsequent gestures, two patterns emerged. First, information in gestures faded over time. A gesture’s salient information, which was clear and precise at first, would become less well articulated in subsequent gestures until it disappeared all together. This pattern manifested as gestures became more and more schematic over the course of the narrative. Second, gestures became packed with more and more accumulated information. Often, information from all previous gestures was necessary for the addressee to understand later gestures. The following is a complete example from the data to illustrate the fading of physical information and accumulation of conceptual information. Addressee responses are in square brackets. Table 1 presents another way of looking at this example. “The other one was just A1 like a plastic, um, stick almost A2 [nods] with a propeller on it? [m-hm] And A3 you have to push, A4 holding [nods] your one palm steady you have to A5 [nods], A6 push the other one and let it go A7 so that it flies [nods and smiles]. A8 But don’t do it A9 towards you ‘cause it might hit your [laughs] face. Yup. And that’s it [nods].” The first two gestures aided in the participant’s verbal physical description of the toy. Without the information from the gestures, the addressee would only be able to discern that the toy consisted of a “stick with a propeller on it”. The verbal information alone did not present any

Authors: Gerwing, Jennifer.
first   previous   Page 22 of 29   next   last



background image
22
One participant indicated where the top of the toy was. She had already indicated the
location and size of the propellers as well as the stick. In later gestures, although
information about the propellers and stick was still conceptually necessary, information
about the top of the toy was not. The gesture she performed indicating the top appeared in
the immediately following gesture as relevant spatial information, but disappeared from
all subsequent gestures both physically and conceptually.
By keeping track of the residuals of each gesture through all subsequent gestures, two patterns
emerged. First, information in gestures faded over time. A gesture’s salient information, which
was clear and precise at first, would become less well articulated in subsequent gestures until it
disappeared all together. This pattern manifested as gestures became more and more schematic
over the course of the narrative. Second, gestures became packed with more and more
accumulated information. Often, information from all previous gestures was necessary for the
addressee to understand later gestures.
The following is a complete example from the data to illustrate the fading of physical
information and accumulation of conceptual information. Addressee responses are in square
brackets. Table 1 presents another way of looking at this example.
“The other one was just
A1
like a plastic, um, stick almost
A2
[nods] with a propeller on it?
[m-hm] And
A3
you have to push,
A4
holding [nods] your one palm steady you have to
A5
[nods],
A6
push the other one and let it go
A7
so that it flies [nods and smiles].
A8
But don’t
do it
A9
towards you ‘cause it might hit your [laughs] face. Yup. And that’s it [nods].”
The first two gestures aided in the participant’s verbal physical description of the toy. Without
the information from the gestures, the addressee would only be able to discern that the toy
consisted of a “stick with a propeller on it”. The verbal information alone did not present any


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 22 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.