All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

How Given and New Information Shape the Form of Conversational Hand Gestures
Unformatted Document Text:  23 clues as to the size, length or orientation of the stick. Even though the word “on” indicated that the propeller was on top of the stick, because the addressee did not know the stick’s orientation, she did not really know how the propeller fit. Furthermore, the verbal description did not indicate how many blades there were on the propeller. The speaker’s gestures during the physical description served to clarify the verbal information. During gesture A1, the speaker pinched together the index finger and thumb of both hands. She then held one hand in front of her, and used the other to “draw” a virtual stick in the air. The imaginary stick was vertical, and thin (as depicted by her pinching fingers) and was also about six inches long. At this point, the addressee nodded. In gesture A2, the speaker indicated the location of the propeller (on top of the vertical stick) and pointed to its two blades. Here the addressee said “m-hm”. The two interlocutors could now take the physical information as given. Although none of this information was absolutely crucial to the later explanation of how the toy worked, it still provided a physical backdrop and became presupposed information for the speaker’s later narrative. Gesture A3 showed the action that the participant used to make the toy fly in the air. Again, the gesture served to clarify the ambiguous nature of the information in the words: “you have to push” by showing exactly what was being pushed: one hand against the other. The hand rubbing occurred exactly where the speaker had placed the vertical stick in her previous gesture. Therefore, the gesture’s meaning made more sense because of the previous gestures, which indicated the orientation and location of the toy. Because of gestures A1 and A2, the speaker did not have to explicitly say (or gesture) that the stick sat vertically between her hands. It was as though she was performing the whirlygig action on a virtual whirlygig created in the previous gestures. The accumulated given information was the gestural description of the toy, which was

Authors: Gerwing, Jennifer.
first   previous   Page 23 of 29   next   last



background image
23
clues as to the size, length or orientation of the stick. Even though the word “on” indicated that
the propeller was on top of the stick, because the addressee did not know the stick’s orientation,
she did not really know how the propeller fit. Furthermore, the verbal description did not indicate
how many blades there were on the propeller.
The speaker’s gestures during the physical description served to clarify the verbal
information. During gesture A1, the speaker pinched together the index finger and thumb of both
hands. She then held one hand in front of her, and used the other to “draw” a virtual stick in the
air. The imaginary stick was vertical, and thin (as depicted by her pinching fingers) and was also
about six inches long. At this point, the addressee nodded. In gesture A2, the speaker indicated
the location of the propeller (on top of the vertical stick) and pointed to its two blades. Here the
addressee said “m-hm”. The two interlocutors could now take the physical information as given.
Although none of this information was absolutely crucial to the later explanation of how the toy
worked, it still provided a physical backdrop and became presupposed information for the
speaker’s later narrative.
Gesture A3 showed the action that the participant used to make the toy fly in the air.
Again, the gesture served to clarify the ambiguous nature of the information in the words: “you
have to push” by showing exactly what was being pushed: one hand against the other. The hand
rubbing occurred exactly where the speaker had placed the vertical stick in her previous gesture.
Therefore, the gesture’s meaning made more sense because of the previous gestures, which
indicated the orientation and location of the toy. Because of gestures A1 and A2, the speaker did
not have to explicitly say (or gesture) that the stick sat vertically between her hands. It was as
though she was performing the whirlygig action on a virtual whirlygig created in the previous
gestures. The accumulated given information was the gestural description of the toy, which was


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 23 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.