All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Engaging the Surveillance System: Cognitive, Emotional, and Physiological Responses to Inappropriate Leader Displays
Unformatted Document Text:  Leader Displays 13 examples of each valence-intensity condition were chosen for the experiment (for details of the pre-test and stimulus construction, see Bucy, 2000). Each news story-presidential reaction sequence was edited on a standard analog video editing console using the formula of a 10-15 second anchor lead-in, followed by a 30-second news report and a 30-second presidential response. This news formula was selected on the grounds that it reflected the general production pattern of political news coverage (see Shook, 2000) and therefore had external validity. Neutral reporter voiceovers identified for each news story and presidential reaction segment were edited onto the tapes in place of the original sound, allowing the news images and Clinton displays to vary along the emotional dimensions of theoretical interest to the study while holding the audio track constant. Using the same the audio track for each story-reaction sequence across conditions served to isolate the effects of image emotion in both the news stories and Clinton reactions. From the eight unique story-reaction sequences, four randomized stimulus orders were assembled. Each order featured a story-reaction sequence for each of the four news topics. Procedure Participants were randomly assigned to one of the four stimulus orders. After signing a consent form, subjects were seated in a comfortable chair approximately 6 feet from a television monitor. Skin conductance, an index of physiological arousal, was measured by placing two Beckman standard AG/AGCL electrodes on the participant’s palm. The electrical signal was passed through a Coulbourn skin conductance coupler and sampled 20 times per second during message exposure. Heart rate, frequently used as an index of attention (A. Lang, Dhillon, & Dong, 1995), was obtained by placing electrodes

Authors: Bucy, Erik. and Bradley, Samuel.
first   previous   Page 13 of 28   next   last



background image
Leader Displays 13
examples of each valence-intensity condition were chosen for the experiment (for details
of the pre-test and stimulus construction, see Bucy, 2000).
Each news story-presidential reaction sequence was edited on a standard analog
video editing console using the formula of a 10-15 second anchor lead-in, followed by a
30-second news report and a 30-second presidential response. This news formula was
selected on the grounds that it reflected the general production pattern of political news
coverage (see Shook, 2000) and therefore had external validity. Neutral reporter
voiceovers identified for each news story and presidential reaction segment were edited
onto the tapes in place of the original sound, allowing the news images and Clinton
displays to vary along the emotional dimensions of theoretical interest to the study while
holding the audio track constant. Using the same the audio track for each story-reaction
sequence across conditions served to isolate the effects of image emotion in both the
news stories and Clinton reactions. From the eight unique story-reaction sequences, four
randomized stimulus orders were assembled. Each order featured a story-reaction
sequence for each of the four news topics.
Procedure
Participants were randomly assigned to one of the four stimulus orders. After
signing a consent form, subjects were seated in a comfortable chair approximately 6 feet
from a television monitor. Skin conductance, an index of physiological arousal, was
measured by placing two Beckman standard AG/AGCL electrodes on the participant’s
palm. The electrical signal was passed through a Coulbourn skin conductance coupler and
sampled 20 times per second during message exposure. Heart rate, frequently used as an
index of attention (A. Lang, Dhillon, & Dong, 1995), was obtained by placing electrodes


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 13 of 28   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.