All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Engaging the Surveillance System: Cognitive, Emotional, and Physiological Responses to Inappropriate Leader Displays
Unformatted Document Text:  Leader Displays 18 beats per minute) than low intensity displays (M = 74.92 beats per minute). The valence of the reaction did not significantly affect heart rate, F(1,34) = .002, p = .96. Thus it appears that the range of intensity seen in presidential reactions is sufficient to cause viewers to pay additional attention. Inclusion of the news factor produced a significant news valence by display intensity interaction, F(1,33) = 7.25, p = .011, ε 2 = .16. In response to valenced images of the news, participants were most attentive to high intensity displays; in particular, viewer heart rate was slowest for high-intensity reactions to negative news (see Figure 5). These results support the hypothesis. Hypothesis 3 predicted that negative leader displays will induce more arousal than positive displays, particularly following negative news segments, regardless of their appropriateness. There was a main effect for display valence on self-reported arousal, F(1,37) = 7.58, p = .009, ε 2 = .14. Subjects reported more arousal after viewing negative displays (M = 5.1) than after viewing positive displays (M = 4.5). Figure 6 shows a

Authors: Bucy, Erik. and Bradley, Samuel.
first   previous   Page 18 of 28   next   last



background image
Leader Displays 18
beats per minute) than low intensity displays (M = 74.92 beats per minute). The valence
of the reaction did not significantly affect heart rate, F(1,34) = .002, p = .96. Thus it
appears that the range of intensity seen in presidential reactions is sufficient to cause
viewers to pay additional attention. Inclusion of the news factor produced a significant
news valence by display intensity interaction, F(1,33) = 7.25, p = .011,
ε
2
= .16. In
response to valenced images of the news, participants were most attentive to high
intensity displays; in particular, viewer heart rate was slowest for high-intensity reactions
to negative news (see Figure 5). These results support the hypothesis.
Hypothesis 3 predicted that negative leader displays will induce more arousal than
positive displays, particularly following negative news segments, regardless of their
appropriateness. There was a main effect for display valence on self-reported arousal,
F(1,37) = 7.58, p = .009,
ε
2
= .14. Subjects reported more arousal after viewing negative
displays (M = 5.1) than after viewing positive displays (M = 4.5). Figure 6 shows a


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 18 of 28   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.