All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Analysis of Discourses Encompassing the 'Migrant Mother' Picture
Unformatted Document Text:  10 crop in California in 1935 left the pickers without work. This family sold their tent to get food.” The caption provides the very realistic explanation for the photograph. With the caption, the Migrant Mother is presented as a woman suffering from hunger. The mother and children of the Migrant Mother picture are viewed helplessly poor, ragged and despairing. They are shown as pitiful people who need government aid. Thus, the photograph symbolizes the poverty of migrant workers and legitimizes the governments' work on their behalf. Second, there is a case of using the Migrant Mother picture to symbolize the strong will of migrant workers bearing up bravely under a desperate situation. The San Francisco News (March 11, 1936) has the Migrant Mother picture as an illustration for the editorial, “What does the ‘New Deal’ mean to this mother and her children?” (Figure 3). The editorial criticizes Californians for their organized opposition of building a government camp for migrant workers and requests their support. The Migrant Mother picture has no caption. The editorial begins with a brief explanation of the picture. It says, "in the fine strong face of this mother, photographed at the camp of starving pea-pickers in San Luis Obispo County, is the tragedy of lives lived in squalor and fear,…" In this article, migrant workers are described as people who are living strongly in a desperate situation. With this written text, the Migrant Mother picture represents the strength and endurance of migrants as well as their poverty and despair. Third, the Migrant Mother picture was used to represent people other than migrant workers who need public aid. United States News uses the Migrant Mother picture in this way. It has only one picture with a brief text. The title says, “Aid for Mother and Children”. The text says that millions of dollars are available for dependent children, for maternal and child health services and so on. There is no mention of the mother as a migrant worker. With this text, Migrant Mother represents general people, not necessarily migrant workers, who need public aid. Fourth, the Migrant Mother picture represents people who worry about the future of America. “Look in her Eyes!” of Midweek Pictorial (October 17, 1936) has the Migrant Mother picture and a map (Figure 4). The article deals with the tenant system, not migration. The text begins with an explanation of the picture. It says: This woman is watching something happen to America and to herself and her children who are a part of America. You can see in her eyes the horror of what is happening, for she is not looking at it with the objectivity of a statistician or professor. She is making no study of farm tenancy, but is feeling its lashings. (Emphasis is added)

Authors: Choi, Hyunju.
first   previous   Page 10 of 18   next   last



background image
10
crop in California in 1935 left the pickers without work. This family sold their tent to get
food.” The caption provides the very realistic explanation for the photograph. With the
caption, the Migrant Mother is presented as a woman suffering from hunger. The mother
and children of the Migrant Mother picture are viewed helplessly poor, ragged and
despairing. They are shown as pitiful people who need government aid. Thus, the
photograph symbolizes the poverty of migrant workers and legitimizes the governments'
work on their behalf.
Second, there is a case of using the Migrant Mother picture to symbolize the strong
will of migrant workers bearing up bravely under a desperate situation. The San Francisco
News (March 11, 1936) has the Migrant Mother picture as an illustration for the editorial,
“What does the ‘New Deal’ mean to this mother and her children?” (Figure 3). The
editorial criticizes Californians for their organized opposition of building a government
camp for migrant workers and requests their support.
The Migrant Mother picture has no caption. The editorial begins with a brief
explanation of the picture. It says, "in the fine strong face of this mother, photographed at
the camp of starving pea-pickers in San Luis Obispo County, is the tragedy of lives lived in
squalor and fear,…" In this article, migrant workers are described as people who are living
strongly in a desperate situation. With this written text, the Migrant Mother picture
represents the strength and endurance of migrants as well as their poverty and despair.
Third, the Migrant Mother picture was used to represent people other than migrant
workers who need public aid. United States News uses the Migrant Mother picture in this
way. It has only one picture with a brief text. The title says, “Aid for Mother and Children”.
The text says that millions of dollars are available for dependent children, for maternal and
child health services and so on. There is no mention of the mother as a migrant worker.
With this text, Migrant Mother represents general people, not necessarily migrant workers,
who need public aid.
Fourth, the Migrant Mother picture represents people who worry about the future of
America. “Look in her Eyes!” of Midweek Pictorial (October 17, 1936) has the Migrant
Mother picture and a map (Figure 4). The article deals with the tenant system, not
migration. The text begins with an explanation of the picture. It says:
This woman is watching something happen to America and to herself and
her children who are a part of America. You can see in her eyes the horror
of what is happening, for she is not looking at it with the objectivity of a
statistician or professor. She is making no study of farm tenancy, but is
feeling its lashings. (Emphasis is added)


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 10 of 18   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.