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EVALUATION OF A BOLIVIAN RADIO BROADCASTING CAMPAIGN: 'FOR STRONGER AND HEALTHIER CHILDREN'
Unformatted Document Text:  Bolivian Media Campaign: For Stronger and Healthier Children 13 new campaign may have among residents who reside in areas that are receiving information through non-media channels, such as the PROCOSI/LINKAGES health promoters. Third, the sample size should be larger to allow for more accurate statistical analyses of the behaviors, especially since the practice indicators are age-specific within the 24-month age span. Fourth, examining differences between knowledge among respondents in the PROCOSI/LINKAGES program and control areas suggests that the program only had a small effect on knowledge above the radio campaign’s effect. In order to further tease out this finding, future studies should include a variable which asks whether the respondent received services provided by the PROCOSI/LINKAGES program. This would enable the analysis to test whether program participants in the areas which also received the radio campaign have higher knowledge and behavior levels than women who only heard the radio campaign. Conclusions The evaluation has three main findings. First, knowledge about infant feeding practices is generally higher in regions which receive PROCOSI/LINKAGES educational programs compared to those which do not receive the program interventions. Second, when considering the acquisition of knowledge, t he evaluation reveals that over 40% of respondents in the program areas learned about feeding practices through a health promoter, compared to less than 10% of those in the control areas. This strongly suggests that NGO programs can achieve the desired goals in perinatal education. In addition, the role of traditional support mechanisms is also clarified in relation to NGO programs. A significant portion of respondents in the control area learned about infant feeding methods from family members. In comparison, the PROCOSI/LINKAGES program seems to overshadow the family’s informal information channel. Third, and most importantly, the radio campaign appeared to be successful. The unaided recall results met the program's measure for success: 60% recall of at least one message. The other measure of success are provided by the finding that the media campaign had a positive and significant effect on the target audience’s knowledge about infant feeding methods. Specifically, among respondents who recalled the media campaign, knowledge was generally comparable among women from the program and control areas. When examining effects of the media campaign on behavior, we also found that the behavior gap between women in the program and control areas was diminished. As a group, these findings suggest that radio is a powerful tool with which to reach widely dispersed audiences in remote regions of Bolivia. In conclusion, we found that the Bolivia radio campaign was a generally successful endeavor that obtained the desired effects of increased knowledge and appropriate infant feeding practices to improve the nutritional status and overall health of young children in Bolivia.

Authors: Maxwell, Kimberly., Borwanker, Reena. and Gonzalez Yucra, Oscar.
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Bolivian Media Campaign: For Stronger and Healthier Children
13
new campaign may have among residents who reside in areas that are receiving information through non-
media channels, such as the PROCOSI/LINKAGES health promoters. Third, the sample size should be
larger to allow for more accurate statistical analyses of the behaviors, especially since the practice
indicators are age-specific within the 24-month age span. Fourth, examining differences between
knowledge among respondents in the PROCOSI/LINKAGES program and control areas suggests that the
program only had a small effect on knowledge above the radio campaign’s effect. In order to further
tease out this finding, future studies should include a variable which asks whether the respondent received
services provided by the PROCOSI/LINKAGES program. This would enable the analysis to test whether
program participants in the areas which also received the radio campaign have higher knowledge and
behavior levels than women who only heard the radio campaign.

Conclusions
The evaluation has three main findings. First, knowledge about infant feeding practices is generally
higher in regions which receive PROCOSI/LINKAGES educational programs compared to those which
do not receive the program interventions. Second, when considering the acquisition of knowledge,
t
he
evaluation reveals that over 40% of respondents in the program areas learned about feeding practices
through a health promoter, compared to less than 10% of those in the control areas. This strongly
suggests that NGO programs can achieve the desired goals in perinatal education. In addition, the role of
traditional support mechanisms is also clarified in relation to NGO programs. A significant portion of
respondents in the control area learned about infant feeding methods from family members. In
comparison, the PROCOSI/LINKAGES program seems to overshadow the family’s informal information
channel. Third, and most importantly, the radio campaign appeared to be successful. The unaided recall
results met the program's measure for success: 60% recall of at least one message. The other measure of
success are provided by the finding that the media campaign had a positive and significant effect on the
target audience’s knowledge about infant feeding methods. Specifically, among respondents who recalled
the media campaign, knowledge was generally comparable among women from the program and control
areas. When examining effects of the media campaign on behavior, we also found that the behavior gap
between women in the program and control areas was diminished. As a group, these findings suggest that
radio is a powerful tool with which to reach widely dispersed audiences in remote regions of Bolivia. In
conclusion, we found that the Bolivia radio campaign was a generally successful endeavor that obtained
the desired effects of increased knowledge and appropriate infant feeding practices to improve the
nutritional status and overall health of young children in Bolivia.


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