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EVALUATION OF A BOLIVIAN RADIO BROADCASTING CAMPAIGN: 'FOR STRONGER AND HEALTHIER CHILDREN'
Unformatted Document Text:  Bolivian Media Campaign: For Stronger and Healthier Children 4 understood by respondents and examined the flow of questions taking into account local usage and the most frequently spoken language. 4. Data Collection and Analysis Data collection took place from the second week of April to the first week of May, 2002. The data was entered and cleaned using Epi info. v 6.04d and the analysis was conducted using SPSS. III. RESULTS Demographics Of the respondents, 74% had a child less than 24 months old and were not currently pregnant, 14% had a child less than 24 months and were also expecting a child, while 12% were pregnant and did not have a child less than 24 months. Nearly half (47%) of all respondents reported some primary schooling, and 26% had at least some secondary education. The majority of respondents (64%) identified their occupation as housewife/mother. More than half (63%) of the respondents reported speaking Castellano at home, and correspondingly 66% of the interviews were completed in Castellano. Of the remaining surveys, 24% were completed in Quechua, and 3% in Aymará. Although there were no signficant differences between program and control areas in age of respondent, marital status, education, or language spoken, it was interesting to note that there was a significant difference in respondents having a child less than 24 months and currently pregnant (20% in control areas compared to only 9% in the program areas, p<0.001). Radio Listening Almost all of the respondents (98%) reported having radios in their homes. Nearly half of all respondents (48%) listen to the radio throughout the day, 17% listen almost every day, and 35% only occasionally listen to the radio. The most popular radio listening time is morning, when 80% of respondents report that they tune into the radio. The next most frequently listened to times are afternoon (38%), nighttime (35%), and midday (14%). Among all respondents, the most popular radio stations were Aclo (16%), San Gabriel (16 %), and PanAmericana (13%). There were no significant differences in preferred radio stations between the program and control groups. Overall, respondents listen to a wide range of radio programs: 81% listen to hear the news, 50% to hear music, 39% for announcements/Public Service Annoucements (PSAs), 11% seek out soap operas, and 7% listen for religious programming. There was only one significant difference in preferred programming by region: 15% of those in the program area reported listening to soap operas, compared to only 5% in the control area (p<.01). Unaided Recall of Any Infant Feeding Message To look at unaided or spontaneous recall, respondents first reported whether they had heard any advice about infant feeding on the radio (Table 2). 74% in the program area and 52% in the control area reported that they had heard such advice. These respondents were then asked to describe what they heard, using an open-ended question. Of these individuals, 65% in the program area and 39% in the control area correctly described at least one of the PROCOSI/LINKAGES campaign themes. These significant differences suggest that respondents in the program areas were aware of young child feeding issues and therefore primed to pay attention to an infant feeding message. It should be noted that recall of any of the key messages was an important indicator, because the program established success as 60% recall of at least one message. The results showed that the program's goal was met.

Authors: Maxwell, Kimberly., Borwanker, Reena. and Gonzalez Yucra, Oscar.
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Bolivian Media Campaign: For Stronger and Healthier Children
4
understood by respondents and examined the flow of questions taking into account local usage and the
most frequently spoken language.
4. Data Collection and Analysis
Data collection took place from the second week of April to the first week of May, 2002. The data was
entered and cleaned using Epi info. v 6.04d and the analysis was conducted using SPSS.
III. RESULTS
Demographics

Of the respondents, 74% had a child less than 24 months old and were not currently pregnant, 14% had a
child less than 24 months and were also expecting a child, while 12% were pregnant and did not have a
child less than 24 months. Nearly half (47%) of all respondents reported some primary schooling, and
26% had at least some secondary education. The majority of respondents (64%) identified their
occupation as housewife/mother. More than half (63%) of the respondents reported speaking Castellano
at home, and correspondingly 66% of the interviews were completed in Castellano. Of the remaining
surveys, 24% were completed in Quechua, and 3% in Aymará. Although there were no signficant
differences between program and control areas in age of respondent, marital status, education, or
language spoken, it was interesting to note that there was a significant difference in respondents having a
child less than 24 months and currently pregnant (20% in control areas compared to only 9% in the
program areas, p<0.001).
Radio Listening
Almost all of the respondents (98%) reported having radios in their homes. Nearly half of all respondents
(48%) listen to the radio throughout the day, 17% listen almost every day, and 35% only occasionally
listen to the radio. The most popular radio listening time is morning, when 80% of respondents report
that they tune into the radio. The next most frequently listened to times are afternoon (38%), nighttime
(35%), and midday (14%). Among all respondents, the most popular radio stations were Aclo (16%), San
Gabriel (16 %), and PanAmericana (13%). There were no significant differences in preferred radio
stations between the program and control groups. Overall, respondents listen to a wide range of radio
programs: 81% listen to hear the news, 50% to hear music, 39% for announcements/Public Service
Annoucements (PSAs), 11% seek out soap operas, and 7% listen for religious programming. There was
only one significant difference in preferred programming by region: 15% of those in the program area
reported listening to soap operas, compared to only 5% in the control area (p<.01).
Unaided Recall of Any Infant Feeding Message

To look at unaided or spontaneous recall, respondents first reported whether they had heard any advice
about infant feeding on the radio (Table 2). 74% in the program area and 52% in the control area reported
that they had heard such advice. These respondents were then asked to describe what they heard, using an
open-ended question. Of these individuals, 65% in the program area and 39% in the control area correctly
described at least one of the PROCOSI/LINKAGES campaign themes. These significant differences
suggest that respondents in the program areas were aware of young child feeding issues and therefore
primed to pay attention to an infant feeding message. It should be noted that recall of any of the key
messages was an important indicator, because the program established success as 60% recall of at least
one message. The results showed that the program's goal was met.


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