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EVALUATION OF A BOLIVIAN RADIO BROADCASTING CAMPAIGN: 'FOR STRONGER AND HEALTHIER CHILDREN'
Unformatted Document Text:  Bolivian Media Campaign: For Stronger and Healthier Children 6 89% of program respondents compared to only 62% of control respondents knew that breastfeeding should be initiated within 1 hour after childbirth. Similar differences arose for accurate EBF (80% vs. 52%) and TCF (81% versus 54%) knowledge. These differences were maintained when the sample was limited to respondents with children in the appropriate age range who were expected to be currently practicing the behavior. However, LAM knowledge was greater in the control area (60% versus 50%). This result suggests that an NGO may have been providing residents in the control areas with information about reproductive health issues. At this point, the researchers made the decision to not include additional LAM analysis, due to the small sample size (n=62) compared to the other behaviors with sample sizes of approximately 350. 2 Table 4. Respondents with Correct Knowledge About Various Infant Feeding Methods Program Control Correct Knowledge N=197 N=154 Timely initiation of breastfeeding within 1 hour after birth % % All Respondents *** Respondents with children 0-<12 months (N) ** Respondents with children 12-<24 months (N) *** 89 89 (103) 89 (70) 62 72 (67) 57 (68) Exclusive breastfeeding N=196 N=153 All Respondents *** Respondents with children 0-<6 months (N) ** 80 86 (43) 52 56 (32) Timely complementary feeding N=197 N=153 All Respondents *** Respondents with children 6-<10 months (N) ** 81 84 (50) 54 52 (21) Knowledge of All 3 LAM Conditions # N=40 N=18 Yes 50 60 * p<0.05; ** p<0.01; *** p<0.001 # Only asked of women who said they ever used LAM (Small Ns). Looking at sources of knowledge across behaviors also suggests that the PROCOSI/LINKAGES program may have effected communication seeking behavior patterns (Table 5). Across behaviors, respondents in the program regions were much more likely to obtain knowledge from a health promoter (41% to 47%) or mother-to-mother support groups (7% to 9%), than were respondents in the control regions (6% to 8% and 0% to 1%, respectively). However, a significantly larger portion of respondents in the control areas received information on infant feeding practices from their family (26% to 36%) than did those in the program area (7% to 15%). This last result suggests the importance of traditional family based information sources in more rural regions. While it is easy to attribute the program area respondent’s reliance on non-traditional health sources to the programs’ many interventions which included interpersonal communications, it is also important to consider that the women in the larger NGO areas may have also moved away from their families and therefore are more likely to rely on other information resources. Table 5. Sources of Knowledge About Infant Feeding Practices Among All Respondents 2 It should be noted that the reduced sample size for LAM knowledge was caused by an error in the survey skip pattern.

Authors: Maxwell, Kimberly., Borwanker, Reena. and Gonzalez Yucra, Oscar.
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Bolivian Media Campaign: For Stronger and Healthier Children
6
89% of program respondents compared to only 62% of control respondents knew that breastfeeding
should be initiated within 1 hour after childbirth. Similar differences arose for accurate EBF (80% vs.
52%) and TCF (81% versus 54%) knowledge. These differences were maintained when the sample was
limited to respondents with children in the appropriate age range who were expected to be currently
practicing the behavior. However, LAM knowledge was greater in the control area (60% versus 50%).
This result suggests that an NGO may have been providing residents in the control areas with information
about reproductive health issues. At this point, the researchers made the decision to not include additional
LAM analysis, due to the small sample size (n=62) compared to the other behaviors with sample sizes of
approximately 350.
2
Table 4. Respondents with Correct Knowledge About Various Infant Feeding Methods
Program
Control
Correct Knowledge
N=197
N=154
Timely initiation of breastfeeding within 1 hour after birth
%
%
All Respondents
***
Respondents with children 0-<12 months (N)
**
Respondents with children 12-<24 months (N)
***
89
89 (103)
89 (70)
62
72 (67)
57 (68)
Exclusive breastfeeding
N=196
N=153
All Respondents
***
Respondents with children 0-<6 months (N)
**
80
86 (43)
52
56 (32)
Timely complementary feeding
N=197
N=153
All Respondents
***
Respondents with children 6-<10 months (N)
**
81
84 (50)
54
52 (21)
Knowledge of All 3 LAM Conditions
#
N=40
N=18
Yes
50
60
*
p<0.05;
**
p<0.01;
***
p<0.001
#
Only asked of women who said they ever used LAM (Small Ns).
Looking at sources of knowledge across behaviors also suggests that the PROCOSI/LINKAGES program
may have effected communication seeking behavior patterns (Table 5). Across behaviors, respondents in
the program regions were much more likely to obtain knowledge from a health promoter (41% to 47%) or
mother-to-mother support groups (7% to 9%), than were respondents in the control regions (6% to 8%
and 0% to 1%, respectively). However, a significantly larger portion of respondents in the control areas
received information on infant feeding practices from their family (26% to 36%) than did those in the
program area (7% to 15%). This last result suggests the importance of traditional family based
information sources in more rural regions. While it is easy to attribute the program area respondent’s
reliance on non-traditional health sources to the programs’ many interventions which included
interpersonal communications, it is also important to consider that the women in the larger NGO areas
may have also moved away from their families and therefore are more likely to rely on other information
resources.
Table 5. Sources of Knowledge About Infant Feeding Practices Among All Respondents
2
It should be noted that the reduced sample size for LAM knowledge was caused by an error in the survey skip
pattern.


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