All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Effects of User Control and Perceived Message Tailoring on Responses to a Health Web Site
Unformatted Document Text:  13 and therefore may have felt more strongly that it was informative for them. This compelling finding deserves further investigation. The findings of this study were obtained from open-ended questions that allowed us to discover which topics were important to participants, because they were not prompted with topics to address. Participants generated their own comments about the strengths and weaknesses they experienced in the web site. Our future studies will use a combination of this technique and standard Likert-type scales, so that more quantitative data can be collected, but before participants respond to rating scales they will first be invited to tell us what matters to them most about the interactive media they have just used. This study of two components of interactivity—user control and perceived message tailoring—shows how a computer-based conversational partner can increase the likelihood that information will be perceived as desirable, high quality, and informative. On the one hand, the study points to useful ways to draw users’ attention to content and to encourage them to trust its quality and usefulness. This can be a good thing when the content is truly of high quality and utility. On the other hand, these approaches could be used inappropriately, especially when the content is not to be trusted. The study also demonstrates the importance of perceived interactivity as a concept to study. With a very minimal intervention, inserting four content-relevant assessment questions at the beginning of a web site, we observed several effects on users’ responses to the site even though the content was held constant across experimental conditions. Further study is now needed to explain why these effects occurred. Future research should test the Elaboration Likelihood Model and other theories of information processing and persuasion to see whether perceived tailored messages will increase, for example, users’ involvement, motivation, amount of invested mental effort, and other cognitive and emotional responses to the interactions provided by the system. References Brug, J., Glanz, K., Van Assema, P., Kok, G., & Van Breukelen, G.J.P. (1998). The influence of computer-tailored feedback and iterative feedback on fat, fruit and vegetable consumption. Health Education and Behavior, 25(4), 517-531. Brug, J., Steenhaus, I., Van Assema, P., & de Vries, H. (1996). The impact of computer-tailored nutrition intervention. Preventive Medicine, 25, 236-242. Burgoon, J. K., Bonito, J. A., Ramirez, A. Jr., Dunbar, N. E., Kam, K, & Fischer, J. (2002). Testing the interactivity principle: Effects of mediation, propinquity, and verbal and nonverbal modalities in interpersonal interaction. Journal of Communication, 52, 657-677. Cacioppo, J. T., Petty, R. E., Kao, C., & Rodriguez, R.,(1986). Central and peripheral routes to persuasion: An individual difference perspective. Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, 51 (5), 1032-1043. Cegala, D. J., (1984). A study of affective and cognitive manifestations of interaction involvement during unstructured and competitive interactions. Communication Monographs, 51, 320-338. Chaiken, S., & Stangor, C., (1987). Attitudes and attitude change. Annual Review of Psychology, 38, 575-630.

Authors: Lieberman, Debra., Lingsweiler, Ryan., Yao, Mike. and Chesler, Zachary.
first   previous   Page 13 of 16   next   last



background image
13
and therefore may have felt more strongly that it was informative for them. This compelling
finding deserves further investigation.

The findings of this study were obtained from open-ended questions that allowed us to discover which
topics were important to participants, because they were not prompted with topics to address. Participants
generated their own comments about the strengths and weaknesses they experienced in the web site. Our
future studies will use a combination of this technique and standard Likert-type scales, so that more
quantitative data can be collected, but before participants respond to rating scales they will first be invited
to tell us what matters to them most about the interactive media they have just used.

This study of two components of interactivity—user control and perceived message tailoring—shows
how a computer-based conversational partner can increase the likelihood that information will be
perceived as desirable, high quality, and informative. On the one hand, the study points to useful ways to
draw users’ attention to content and to encourage them to trust its quality and usefulness. This can be a
good thing when the content is truly of high quality and utility. On the other hand, these approaches
could be used inappropriately, especially when the content is not to be trusted.

The study also demonstrates the importance of perceived interactivity as a concept to study. With a very
minimal intervention, inserting four content-relevant assessment questions at the beginning of a web site,
we observed several effects on users’ responses to the site even though the content was held constant
across experimental conditions. Further study is now needed to explain why these effects occurred.
Future research should test the Elaboration Likelihood Model and other theories of information
processing and persuasion to see whether perceived tailored messages will increase, for example, users’
involvement, motivation, amount of invested mental effort, and other cognitive and emotional responses
to the interactions provided by the system.
References

Brug, J., Glanz, K., Van Assema, P., Kok, G., & Van Breukelen, G.J.P. (1998). The influence of
computer-tailored feedback and iterative feedback on fat, fruit and vegetable
consumption. Health Education and Behavior, 25(4), 517-531.
Brug, J., Steenhaus, I., Van Assema, P., & de Vries, H. (1996). The impact of computer-tailored
nutrition intervention. Preventive Medicine, 25, 236-242.
Burgoon, J. K., Bonito, J. A., Ramirez, A. Jr., Dunbar, N. E., Kam, K, & Fischer, J. (2002). Testing
the interactivity principle: Effects of mediation, propinquity, and verbal and nonverbal
modalities in interpersonal interaction. Journal of Communication, 52, 657-677.
Cacioppo, J. T., Petty, R. E., Kao, C., & Rodriguez, R.,(1986). Central and peripheral routes to
persuasion: An individual difference perspective. Journal of Personality & Social
Psychology, 51 (5), 1032-1043.
Cegala, D. J., (1984). A study of affective and cognitive manifestations of interaction
involvement during unstructured and competitive interactions. Communication
Monographs, 51, 320-338.
Chaiken, S., & Stangor, C., (1987). Attitudes and attitude change. Annual Review of
Psychology, 38, 575-630.


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 13 of 16   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.