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Flock Theory: A New Model of Emergent Self-Organization in Human Interaction
Unformatted Document Text:  Flock Theory 10 Morgan discussed how higher levels of complex organization emerge from lower levels (Morgan, 1923). Sawyer uses his analysis of improvisational theater as analogy to these concepts. Much as actors create a dialogue with no preconceived notions of where they will go, an understanding of this knowledge cannot stem from each individual actor. Understanding can only arise out of the collaborative creation and the analysis of the group as a whole. Wholeness in group behavior is emergent in instances where a structured plan directing the group is not present or where there is no defined leader directing the group. Thus collaborative emergence occurs in such routine situations as conversations and brainstorming sessions, where improvisation results from the lack of a director or script. Improvisational theatre, much like jazz improvisation, is egalitarian by default. There is no group leader and any attempts to control the situation corrode the structure and are often shunned by other members. The communication in these situations is collaboratively emergent because with each actor’s input a possible path is chosen, closing off a multitude of other paths. It is this element of the emergence of creativity is related to self-organizing systems in that the moves of each actor cause a need for internal organization based on a series of rules intended to maintain the egalitarian (and thus cooperatively emergent) setting, and these rules provide the impetus for this paper. However, it is important to establish the nature of the self-organization that is most applicable to emergent phenomena when a system has a set organization that is closed to environmental forces, yet remains structurally open to these forces, as explained below. Autopoiesis

Authors: Rosen, Devan.
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Flock Theory 10
Morgan discussed how higher levels of complex organization emerge from lower levels
(Morgan, 1923).
Sawyer uses his analysis of improvisational theater as analogy to these concepts. Much
as actors create a dialogue with no preconceived notions of where they will go, an understanding
of this knowledge cannot stem from each individual actor. Understanding can only arise out of
the collaborative creation and the analysis of the group as a whole.
Wholeness in group behavior is emergent in instances where a structured plan directing
the group is not present or where there is no defined leader directing the group. Thus
collaborative emergence occurs in such routine situations as conversations and brainstorming
sessions, where improvisation results from the lack of a director or script.
Improvisational theatre, much like jazz improvisation, is egalitarian by default. There is
no group leader and any attempts to control the situation corrode the structure and are often
shunned by other members. The communication in these situations is collaboratively emergent
because with each actor’s input a possible path is chosen, closing off a multitude of other paths.
It is this element of the emergence of creativity is related to self-organizing systems in that the
moves of each actor cause a need for internal organization based on a series of rules intended to
maintain the egalitarian (and thus cooperatively emergent) setting, and these rules provide the
impetus for this paper. However, it is important to establish the nature of the self-organization
that is most applicable to emergent phenomena when a system has a set organization that is
closed to environmental forces, yet remains structurally open to these forces, as explained
below.
Autopoiesis


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