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Flock Theory: A New Model of Emergent Self-Organization in Human Interaction
Unformatted Document Text:  Flock Theory 12 the individual organizes the internal structure to adapt to the environmental forces. Yet it is important to maintain the internal organization, so this coupling and evolution operate on a pattern based recognition and accommodating replication. It is in this sense that a set of rules of interaction can maintain the cooperative evolution of a group regardless of the shifting of group members or the setting the group is in. Boids In 1987 computer scientist Craig Reynolds undertook the task of creating a computer rendering of a bird flock. He comments on flocks, “A flock exhibits many contrasts. It is made up of discrete birds yet overall motion seems fluid; it is simple in concept yet is so visually complex, it seems randomly arrayed and yet is magnificently synchronized. Perhaps most puzzling is the strong impression of intentional, centralized control.” (Reynolds, 1987, p.2). As Reynolds was tackling with the representation of such group movement, he derived three simple rules that can incorporate the vast complexity of a flock. Rule 1. Collision Avoidance: avoid collisions with nearby flockmates Rule 2. Velocity Matching: attempt to match velocity with nearby flockmates. Rule 3. Flock Centering: attempt to stay close to nearby flockmates. Using these rules Reynolds is able to successfully represent flocks as “boids” in computer simulation. These boids can avoid environmental objects as well as split of from and rejoin the flock (see Figure 1, or go to http://www.red3d.com/cwr/boids/ ).

Authors: Rosen, Devan.
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Flock Theory 12
the individual organizes the internal structure to adapt to the environmental forces. Yet it is
important to maintain the internal organization, so this coupling and evolution operate on a
pattern based recognition and accommodating replication. It is in this sense that a set of rules of
interaction can maintain the cooperative evolution of a group regardless of the shifting of group
members or the setting the group is in.
Boids
In 1987 computer scientist Craig Reynolds undertook the task of creating a computer
rendering of a bird flock. He comments on flocks,
“A flock exhibits many contrasts. It is made up of discrete birds yet overall motion
seems fluid; it is simple in concept yet is so visually complex, it seems randomly
arrayed and yet is magnificently synchronized. Perhaps most puzzling is the strong
impression of intentional, centralized control.” (Reynolds, 1987, p.2).
As Reynolds was tackling with the representation of such group movement, he derived
three simple rules that can incorporate the vast complexity of a flock.
Rule
1.
Collision Avoidance: avoid collisions with nearby flockmates
Rule
2.
Velocity Matching: attempt to match velocity with nearby flockmates.
Rule
3.
Flock Centering: attempt to stay close to nearby flockmates.
Using these rules Reynolds is able to successfully represent flocks as “boids” in computer
simulation. These boids can avoid environmental objects as well as split of from and rejoin the
flock (see Figure 1, or go to
http://www.red3d.com/cwr/boids/
).


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