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Flock Theory: A New Model of Emergent Self-Organization in Human Interaction
Unformatted Document Text:  Flock Theory 15 This axiom is also related to cohesion networks, where distance is modeled as cohesion. Too much or too little cohesion can thus be seen as a productivity decay function. The actors need to maintain a level of cohesion that allows for individual input without sacrificing group acceptance. Distance in this case is also related to communication convergence. Convergence implies that the individuals are moving toward a point, which could be toward each other or toward a common interest (Kincaid, 1988). As actors attempt to converge, they must maintain an optimum distance from each other as to allow for the inclusion of all actors to converge, thus resulting in mutual convergence of the group. Likewise, as the interaction progresses, the amount of convergence will fluctuate and the structural needs of the flock will require the individuals to monitor cognitive as well as cohesive distance. Tenet A: Separation; close but not too close (Extreme Cohesion). Tenet A states the first half of Axiom 1, where the actors avoid situations where the others within the group are too convergent, or too homogeneous. If this tenet is not maintained then group cohesion will increase resulting in groupthink from self-censorship and unanimity. Research has found that high levels of cohesion can lead to Groupthink and decay the quality of the group interaction. For example, Turner & Pratkanis (1992) found that in Groupthink occurred more frequently in situations of extremely high cohesion. Another interpretation of this tenet is that of accountability. If cooperation is to happen within the group each member must be accountable for their own actions without relying on cohesion to bail them out. Accountability can be related to two antecedent conditions of Groupthink. First, accountability inhibits the possible insulation of the group by forcing the members to consider other party’s point of view. Second, the lack of impartial (promotional)

Authors: Rosen, Devan.
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Flock Theory 15
This axiom is also related to cohesion networks, where distance is modeled as cohesion.
Too much or too little cohesion can thus be seen as a productivity decay function. The actors
need to maintain a level of cohesion that allows for individual input without sacrificing group
acceptance.
Distance in this case is also related to communication convergence. Convergence implies
that the individuals are moving toward a point, which could be toward each other or toward a
common interest (Kincaid, 1988). As actors attempt to converge, they must maintain an
optimum distance from each other as to allow for the inclusion of all actors to converge, thus
resulting in mutual convergence of the group. Likewise, as the interaction progresses, the
amount of convergence will fluctuate and the structural needs of the flock will require the
individuals to monitor cognitive as well as cohesive distance.
Tenet A: Separation; close but not too close (Extreme Cohesion).
Tenet A states the first half of Axiom 1, where the actors avoid situations where the
others within the group are too convergent, or too homogeneous. If this tenet is not maintained
then group cohesion will increase resulting in groupthink from self-censorship and unanimity.
Research has found that high levels of cohesion can lead to Groupthink and decay the quality of
the group interaction. For example, Turner & Pratkanis (1992) found that in Groupthink
occurred more frequently in situations of extremely high cohesion.
Another interpretation of this tenet is that of accountability. If cooperation is to happen
within the group each member must be accountable for their own actions without relying on
cohesion to bail them out. Accountability can be related to two antecedent conditions of
Groupthink. First, accountability inhibits the possible insulation of the group by forcing the
members to consider other party’s point of view. Second, the lack of impartial (promotional)


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