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Flock Theory: A New Model of Emergent Self-Organization in Human Interaction
Unformatted Document Text:  Flock Theory 16 leadership and accountability makes it crucial for all individuals in the group to be able to justify the decision reached by the group, resulting in the decrease in the concentration of power in one domineering leader. For example, Groupthink typically occurs in decision making about nonroutine, crucial issues, that may affect large numbers of people (Kroon, van Kreveld, & Jacob, 1991). Kroon et al. (1991) also postulate that accountability is expected to reduce the likelihood that group members will give in to conformity pressures. Accountability is also expected to induce evaluation apprehension, catalyzing normative behaviors and causing one to have a tendency to “cover one’s tracks” and underestimate the performance of ones group. Kroon et al (1991) found that accountability led to more complexity in reaching consensus, better decisions, and less risky decisions. Tenet B: Cohesion; far but not too far. (Extreme Dissenters) Tenet B completes Axiom 1 by maintaining the balance of Tenet A. This tenet operates under similar theoretical justification as Tenet A but balances potential situations where efforts to maintain individuality is suppressed. The actors must attempt to converge with others to maintain a cooperative group, even if this movement is simply for greater uniformity in situations of system breakdown. Another important implication that the Turner & Pratkanis (1992) study revealed is the slight reformation of groupthink theory to include tactics of social identity maintenance, where members of the group attempt to maintain a shared, positive view of the functioning of the group. A precondition to cohesion is the categorization of the members as a group, thus they tend to develop a positive image of the group and desire to protect that image. The application of the social identity maintenance (SIM) perspective draws interesting parallels to the groupthink model.

Authors: Rosen, Devan.
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Flock Theory 16
leadership and accountability makes it crucial for all individuals in the group to be able to justify
the decision reached by the group, resulting in the decrease in the concentration of power in one
domineering leader. For example, Groupthink typically occurs in decision making about
nonroutine, crucial issues, that may affect large numbers of people (Kroon, van Kreveld, &
Jacob, 1991). Kroon et al. (1991) also postulate that accountability is expected to reduce the
likelihood that group members will give in to conformity pressures. Accountability is also
expected to induce evaluation apprehension, catalyzing normative behaviors and causing one to
have a tendency to “cover one’s tracks” and underestimate the performance of ones group.
Kroon et al (1991) found that accountability led to more complexity in reaching consensus,
better decisions, and less risky decisions.
Tenet B: Cohesion; far but not too far. (Extreme Dissenters)
Tenet B completes Axiom 1 by maintaining the balance of Tenet A. This tenet operates
under similar theoretical justification as Tenet A but balances potential situations where efforts
to maintain individuality is suppressed. The actors must attempt to converge with others to
maintain a cooperative group, even if this movement is simply for greater uniformity in
situations of system breakdown.
Another important implication that the Turner & Pratkanis (1992) study revealed is the
slight reformation of groupthink theory to include tactics of social identity maintenance, where
members of the group attempt to maintain a shared, positive view of the functioning of the
group. A precondition to cohesion is the categorization of the members as a group, thus they
tend to develop a positive image of the group and desire to protect that image. The application
of the social identity maintenance (SIM) perspective draws interesting parallels to the groupthink
model.


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