All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Flock Theory: A New Model of Emergent Self-Organization in Human Interaction
Unformatted Document Text:  Flock Theory 19 Illustrating this point is the case of a scientific revolution (Kuhn, 1962), where the group is defined as an academic community and the direction is the communally defined body of knowledge. For example, when a scientist introduces a revolutionary concept there should ideally be initial support from their colleagues to facilitate the exploration of the concept. This also relates to Axiom 1, where the idea must be relatively different from the current knowledge base, but not too far or the academic community may reject the concept altogether. Likewise, the proposed structure is designed to foster a climate that catalyzes the birthing of potential revolutionary concepts. Tenet B: Velocity Matching (Tempo). Tenet B of Axiom 2 states that the group members must accommodate the rate that the other members are delivering messages, making successive moves, and allowing for space between these moves. In a face-to-face context this is theoretically justified through communication accommodation theory (Gallois, Franklyn-Stokes, Giles, & Coupland,1988; and Kincaid, 1988), defines further moves of the group whether convergent or divergent. As presented by Gallois et al. (1988), the marginalized other is converged toward when they are not a threat to a dominant group’s identity, but this changes when this person’s identity is perceived as a threat to the dominant group. The marginalized other is diverged from when a threat to a dominant group’s identity, changing when this person’s identity is not perceived as a threat to the dominant group. This happens in conjuncture with Tenet A of Axiom 2, direction, for if the velocity is matched but not as to converge to a similar direction, than the system breaks down. A cross-functional team, for example, must maintain the rate at which the attention moves from function to function amongst its members. Likewise, as bursts of activity are demanded from the group, it becomes increasingly important for the individuals to attempt to

Authors: Rosen, Devan.
first   previous   Page 19 of 28   next   last



background image
Flock Theory 19
Illustrating this point is the case of a scientific revolution (Kuhn, 1962), where the group
is defined as an academic community and the direction is the communally defined body of
knowledge. For example, when a scientist introduces a revolutionary concept there should
ideally be initial support from their colleagues to facilitate the exploration of the concept. This
also relates to Axiom 1, where the idea must be relatively different from the current knowledge
base, but not too far or the academic community may reject the concept altogether. Likewise,
the proposed structure is designed to foster a climate that catalyzes the birthing of potential
revolutionary concepts.
Tenet B: Velocity Matching (Tempo).
Tenet B of Axiom 2 states that the group members must accommodate the rate that the
other members are delivering messages, making successive moves, and allowing for space
between these moves. In a face-to-face context this is theoretically justified through
communication accommodation theory (Gallois, Franklyn-Stokes, Giles, & Coupland,1988; and
Kincaid, 1988), defines further moves of the group whether convergent or divergent. As
presented by Gallois et al. (1988), the marginalized other is converged toward when they are not
a threat to a dominant group’s identity, but this changes when this person’s identity is perceived
as a threat to the dominant group. The marginalized other is diverged from when a threat to a
dominant group’s identity, changing when this person’s identity is not perceived as a threat to the
dominant group. This happens in conjuncture with Tenet A of Axiom 2, direction, for if the
velocity is matched but not as to converge to a similar direction, than the system breaks down.
A cross-functional team, for example, must maintain the rate at which the attention
moves from function to function amongst its members. Likewise, as bursts of activity are
demanded from the group, it becomes increasingly important for the individuals to attempt to


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 19 of 28   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.