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Flock Theory: A New Model of Emergent Self-Organization in Human Interaction
Unformatted Document Text:  Flock Theory 22 interaction over time. These groups are being used to gain insight in accordance with the axioms presented above. Collaborative research efforts also examine the use of 3-D Graphical Chat Rooms for informal science education. This research focuses on the use of semantic network analysis tools incorporating word co-occurrences in chat conversation using Catpac (Woelfel, 1998) to provide insight into the nature of immersive chat based interaction. The focus of this path is two fold, first to test whether online environments already exemplify an increased likelihood of cooperative evolution; second, as a potential means for experimental testing of cooperative task and social groups. The second research stream involving flock theory is in cooperation with sociology researchers in an effort to replicate flocking behavior using cellular automata and Hopfield networks to simulate multi-agent interaction using the conditions of flock theory. Proposed applications to explore these dynamic networks include task groups and simulated musical improvisation. Likewise, different forms of cellular automata are being considered such as cellular automata simulations utilizing irregular grids. Contributions to Social Science The majority of research in the area of emergence has been limited to conceptual and substantive investigation. Given the complexity of the concepts it has been extremely difficult to contribute to the methodological treatment. The exception to this is research in artificial societies and the use of powerful heuristic computer simulations (Axelrod, 1997). Such simulations have “created artificial social worlds, in which modeled agents interact in various ways, often to create surprising, systematic outcomes,” (Hodgsen 2000, p. 71). These simulations have shown the emergence of order and higher-level properties in complex systems.

Authors: Rosen, Devan.
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Flock Theory 22
interaction over time. These groups are being used to gain insight in accordance with the axioms
presented above. Collaborative research efforts also examine the use of 3-D Graphical Chat
Rooms for informal science education. This research focuses on the use of semantic network
analysis tools incorporating word co-occurrences in chat conversation using Catpac (Woelfel,
1998) to provide insight into the nature of immersive chat based interaction. The focus of this
path is two fold, first to test whether online environments already exemplify an increased
likelihood of cooperative evolution; second, as a potential means for experimental testing of
cooperative task and social groups.
The second research stream involving flock theory is in cooperation with sociology
researchers in an effort to replicate flocking behavior using cellular automata and Hopfield
networks to simulate multi-agent interaction using the conditions of flock theory. Proposed
applications to explore these dynamic networks include task groups and simulated musical
improvisation. Likewise, different forms of cellular automata are being considered such as
cellular automata simulations utilizing irregular grids.
Contributions to Social Science
The majority of research in the area of emergence has been limited to conceptual and
substantive investigation. Given the complexity of the concepts it has been extremely difficult to
contribute to the methodological treatment. The exception to this is research in artificial
societies and the use of powerful heuristic computer simulations (Axelrod, 1997). Such
simulations have “created artificial social worlds, in which modeled agents interact in various
ways, often to create surprising, systematic outcomes,” (Hodgsen 2000, p. 71). These
simulations have shown the emergence of order and higher-level properties in complex systems.


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