All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Flock Theory: A New Model of Emergent Self-Organization in Human Interaction
Unformatted Document Text:  Flock Theory 8 organizing. As such, they offer a different route, other that reciprocal disclosure, to community.” Jamming Eisenberg (1990) notes that traditional perspectives on communication and organizing fail to account for several aspects of organized action, mainly experiences associated with minimal disclosure. “Jamming encourages both cooperation and individuation,” (p. 146) Similar to mutual equivalence structures (Weick, 1979), jamming situations may be highly rule governed, structured, activities where little to no personal information is exchanged. Yet, goals are accomplished and a strong bond is formed amongst jammers. Such jamming situations become appealing because they enable the actors to feel a part of a larger community, without the commitment of revealing much personal information. As a result of the lack of personal disclosure required in jamming, self-consciousness can disappear. Jamming, however, may not be a condition easily attained or maintained. Eisenberg argues that jamming requires a clear set of rules and structures, such as a persons need to surrender to the experience, engaging respectfully in the interaction, and dominant leader qualities such as using the exchange to unload on or control others dissolves the possibility for such an interaction. Structurally, jamming illustrates a case where structure can be seen as liberating instead of constraining. There are low expectations for future interaction as a result of the lack of emphasis on individual personality traits, allowing the actors to cooperate without self- consciousness. Likewise, this highly structured setting places relatively few requirements on dealing with and accounting for individual personalities. Improvisation thus becomes an important aspect of jamming. This notion of structure includes formal and informal rules. For example, in jazz these can be seen as rules of musical

Authors: Rosen, Devan.
first   previous   Page 8 of 28   next   last



background image
Flock Theory 8
organizing. As such, they offer a different route, other that reciprocal disclosure, to
community.”
Jamming
Eisenberg (1990) notes that traditional perspectives on communication and organizing
fail to account for several aspects of organized action, mainly experiences associated with
minimal disclosure. “Jamming encourages both cooperation and individuation,” (p. 146)
Similar to mutual equivalence structures (Weick, 1979), jamming situations may be
highly rule governed, structured, activities where little to no personal information is exchanged.
Yet, goals are accomplished and a strong bond is formed amongst jammers. Such jamming
situations become appealing because they enable the actors to feel a part of a larger community,
without the commitment of revealing much personal information. As a result of the lack of
personal disclosure required in jamming, self-consciousness can disappear.
Jamming, however, may not be a condition easily attained or maintained. Eisenberg
argues that jamming requires a clear set of rules and structures, such as a persons need to
surrender to the experience, engaging respectfully in the interaction, and dominant leader
qualities such as using the exchange to unload on or control others dissolves the possibility for
such an interaction.
Structurally, jamming illustrates a case where structure can be seen as liberating instead
of constraining. There are low expectations for future interaction as a result of the lack of
emphasis on individual personality traits, allowing the actors to cooperate without self-
consciousness. Likewise, this highly structured setting places relatively few requirements on
dealing with and accounting for individual personalities.
Improvisation thus becomes an important aspect of jamming. This notion of structure
includes formal and informal rules. For example, in jazz these can be seen as rules of musical


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 8 of 28   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.