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Flock Theory: A New Model of Emergent Self-Organization in Human Interaction
Unformatted Document Text:  Flock Theory 9 keys or progressions (formal) and how long you can play (informal). As local conventions vary, there is a set of core rules that a person must know and follow in order for the interaction to take on a jamming situation. However, too much attention to the rules increases the possibility of ego by moving the individual toward self-consciousness, illustrating that jamming is only possible when rule and role structures are assumed and taken for granted. Another important element of jamming is the surrender of control, because one cannot jam at will and without interdependence with the other actors, and much can be gained by preparation and development of the right attitudes as well as seeking compatible partners. Organizational settings must foster a structure for surrender, where risk is rewarded and work groups are kept sufficiently autonomous to ensure an influx of novel ideas. Emergence of Creativity Working on the emergence of creativity, R. Keith Sawyer has established a body of work visiting notions such as collaborative emergence and emergent evolution as support. Properties of what Sawyer calls the emergence of creativity via emergent evolution capture the essence of cooperative evolution. Discussion of these concepts stems from a seminal paper by Sawyer (1999) entitled The Emergence of Creativity. Central to his constructs is wholeness, or that a result is not necessarily reducible to the sum of its parts. Similar perspectives as are discussed at length by Lewes (1877), “Every resultant is either a sum or a difference of the co-operant forces … and is clearly traceable in its components … the emergent … cannot be reduced either to their sum or their differences,” (Lewes, 1877, pp. 368-369). Borrowing from Lewes’ concept of emergent evolution, C. Lloyd Morgan began a series of lectures in 1922 with a discussion of evolutionary developments and their emergence over time.

Authors: Rosen, Devan.
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Flock Theory 9
keys or progressions (formal) and how long you can play (informal). As local conventions vary,
there is a set of core rules that a person must know and follow in order for the interaction to take
on a jamming situation. However, too much attention to the rules increases the possibility of ego
by moving the individual toward self-consciousness, illustrating that jamming is only possible
when rule and role structures are assumed and taken for granted.
Another important element of jamming is the surrender of control, because one cannot
jam at will and without interdependence with the other actors, and much can be gained by
preparation and development of the right attitudes as well as seeking compatible partners.
Organizational settings must foster a structure for surrender, where risk is rewarded and work
groups are kept sufficiently autonomous to ensure an influx of novel ideas.
Emergence of Creativity
Working on the emergence of creativity, R. Keith Sawyer has established a body of work
visiting notions such as collaborative emergence and emergent evolution as support. Properties
of what Sawyer calls the emergence of creativity via emergent evolution capture the essence of
cooperative evolution. Discussion of these concepts stems from a seminal paper by Sawyer
(1999) entitled The Emergence of Creativity.
Central to his constructs is wholeness, or that a result is not necessarily reducible to the
sum of its parts. Similar perspectives as are discussed at length by Lewes (1877),
“Every resultant is either a sum or a difference of the co-operant forces … and is clearly
traceable in its components … the emergent … cannot be reduced either to their sum or
their differences,” (Lewes, 1877, pp. 368-369).
Borrowing from Lewes’ concept of emergent evolution, C. Lloyd Morgan began a series of
lectures in 1922 with a discussion of evolutionary developments and their emergence over time.


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